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X LIBRIS 



COPYRIGHT 

Doris Bradley - - - - Editor 
John Feirer - Business Manager 



TOWER 

1935 

^Annual zLublication 
of the 

STOUT INSTITUTE 
Menomonie, Wis. 




TEACHER who can 
broaden and enliven a wealth 
of intellectual experience with 
the sparkling freshness char- 
acteristic of young people 
needs no more to win the ad- 
miration of her students. Such 
a teacher have we; and be- 
cause she has, with sympathy 
and understanding of the spir- 
it of youth, for twenty-five 
years guided and inspired 
those who seek learning at 
The Stout Institute, it is to 
Mabel Leedom we dedicate 
the 1935 Tower. 



DEDICATION 



CONTENTS 

Administration 
Classes 
Organizations 
Athletics 
Features 



IN MEMORIAM 

Myrtle Rowe 1912-1934 

Edward Schwartz - 1909-1934 




Wander with me in fancy's maze . . . 
Look again at our "cloud capp'd 
tower/' and recall how often of an 
evening "Black it stood as night." 



Leave the Tower! And hear how the 
walls across the way ring with the soft 
music of a Prom waltz, the gay laugh- 
ter of a masquerade ball. 





Look yonder at Home Economics 
Hall. How familiar every window- 
through which we have gazed in con- 
centration, pleading the sky to help 
knowledge "grow from more to more." 



Approach the threshold of learning, 
through which many more like us "shall 
run to and fro, and knowledge shall be 
increased." 





A backward glance discovers the 
door to the Tower's home — "Portals 
that lead to an enchanted land . . . 
Here, it is written, Toil shall have its 

wace." 



Lead on through well-known paths, 
and pause, and feel a poet's ecstacy — 
"Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! 
The river glideth at his own sweet will." 





Seek again the chosen spot where 
two of you "By the waters of Life sat 
together, hand in hand, in the golden 
days . . . When skies were purple and 
breath was praise." 



We must end our journey; evening 
steals upon us. "O Nightl most beauti- 
ful and rare! Thou givest the heavens 
their holiest hue! " 







THIRTY-FIVE 




To you, the Class of '35, I want to talk about tomorrow in the light of today 
and the memories of yesterday. This is today a more common topic of conver- 
sation than ever before. It is deserving of more serious thought than is being 
given to it. You have, after years of sacrifice and hard work, prepared yourself 
to honorably and competently earn and serve. What are the prospects? 

Tomorrow will not be as yesterday. The world has changed over night. 
The social conditions facing you are not the social conditions which faced your 
fathers or mothers at your age. Today full preparation, even superior prepar- 
ation for a particular job does not insure employment on that job. Just here is 
the test of all the teaching of these years. Courage, first of all, to stand firm for 
your convictions is an essential background to future usefulness. Determina- 
tion to win, to find the place where your services may be needed and patience in 
the interim between graduation and employment are the qualities essential in 
the beginning of a new career in this new day. 

The foundation upon which America is built is sound. Selfishness and 
greed, prejudice and hate have weakened the super-structure. That can be 
repaired, and that is your job. 

To find employment for every man who wants it and to influence every man 
to want a job is just now a major problem. It will be solved tomorrow or the 
next day, and your place in the new order will be determined according to your 
preparation. — Burton E. Nelson, President 



Page Nineteen 



:THE TOWER 




Many regard the modern social situation as a challenge to education greater 
than the challenges of the last few generations. Curriculum experimentation 
is going forward in a breadth and on a scale to give much promise. There are 
indications which point to the possibilities of making Practical Arts subjects core 
studies, rather than special subjects. Direction pointing developments seem to 
indicate that the problem for us in the Practical Arts field is not so much that 
of maintaining our offerings in the plan of public education, but rather one of 
bending every energy to meet the tremendous new responsibilities which are 
rapidly becoming ours. 

The activity movement brings increasing recognition of the need and value 
of integration in educational opportunities. Subject division lines in education 
are crossed or eliminated just as occupational division lines are changed in in- 
dustry. In our developing curriculum at The Stout Institute, we are making 
every possible provision for students in training and teachers in service to enable 
them to keep pace and to look ahead. 

Young people in preparation for occupations, and adults participating in 
occupational work, must be constantly on the alert to meet the new occupational 
definitions resulting from technological change, structural change, and func- 
tional change. As we plan our progress at The Stout Institute we are acutely 
aware that new social frontiers are bringing us new educational problems, new 
responsibilities, and new opportunities. 

C. A. Bowman, 
Dean of the School of Industrial Education. 



Page Twenty 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Social progress is based upon appraisals of the results of many social 
efforts. Such evaluations are stimulating and suggest ways and means of re- 
taining and using findings of value and discarding others. Home Economics, 
along with many other social and educational movements, has been subjected 
in recent years to such appraisals. It is the belief of general education 
today that the desires, attitudes, and reactions of students are of more vital 
significance than the acquisition of facts and skills. Home Economists believe 
in this to the extent that more of their emphasis is placed upon aiding the student 
to develop the personal characteristics and cultivate those attitudes which are 
conducive to the fine art of living. 

Contributions of Home Economics as an educational and social agency are 
largely influenced by this philosophy. Dyer states the scope of Home Economics 
in this way: "This education trains the members of the family group, living in 
close contact with one another, to see how personality is influenced and de- 
veloped and how one must adjust oneself to different situations. They must 
know the importance of mental health and its relation to physical well-being. 
Modern health standards must make clear to them the significance of the phy- 
siological aspect of homemaking. They must be trained as ultimate consumers 
for the part they play in the business world as members of a social group. They 
must learn to appreciate the sociological significance of their standards of 
living." 

Ruth E. Michaels, 
Dean of the School of Home Economics. 



Page Twenty-one 



THE TOWER 




An iceberg is two-thirds submerged. Along the oceanways of the world 
it rears its head, the third that the voyager may see. But those who travel much 
where icebergs loom come to appreciate the importance of the submerged two- 
thirds. 

So it is with almost all of our professions, the greater part of the education 
involved remains below the surface of obvious use. Particularly is it true of 
the teaching profession. A man or a woman is educated to be a teacher of 
French, of Home Economics, of Industrial Arts. The third of his college education 
which bears directly on that which he will teach is the part of his education that 
will be most visible to his students, to his employers. The two-thirds which 
represents his share of an education designed to prepare him for the privileges 
and duties of effective participation in school and community life will not be 
directly visible. 

It will include mastery of his native language, some familiarity with the 
principles of science, some informed attitudes on society and social problems, 
some appreciations in literature and art, a comprehension of the significance 
of history in human life, and some cultivation of the arts and skills of teaching. 

These will lend him stability and give him dignity among his fellows. If 
in his college life he pursues these broader aspects of his education with the 
same zeal as he gives to his special or technical education, he must inevitably 
be a better teacher, a better colleague, and a better citizen. 

J. Erie Grinnell, 
Director, Liberal Arts and Education. 



Page Twenty-two 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Top row: Ernest Schultz, George Hambrecht, lohn Wikstrand, John Callahan. 
Middle row: Louis Holthusen, Voyta Wrabetz, Harry Griswold, J. E. Leverich. 
Bottom row: Edward Roll, Harold Falk, Jessel Whyte, Peter Schoemann. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Employee Members — Peter T. Schoemann, Milwaukee 
Louis Holthusen, Green Bay 
John Wikstrand, Superior 
Agricultural Members — H. W. Griswold, West Salem 

E. R. Roll, Eau Claire 
J. E. Leverich, Sparta 
Employer Members — Jessel S. Whyte, Kenosha 
Harold S. Falk, Milwaukee 
Ernest W. Schultz, Sheboygan 
Ex Officio Members — John Callahan, State Superintendent of Schools 

Voyta Wrabetz, State Industrial Commission 
Officers of the Board — President: Ernest W. Schultz 

Secretary: George P. Hambrecht 



Page Twenty-three 





FREDA M. BACHMANN 
Biological Science 



ARTHUR G. BROWN 
Education 



EARL BURBIDGE 

Physical Education 

Coaching 



LILLIAN CARSON 
Related Arts 



WINONNA M. CRUISE 
Nutrition 



IOHN M. DAWLEY 

Political Science 

Economics 



WILLIAM BAKER 
Printing 



LOUISE BUCHANAN 
Foods 



GERTRUDE L. CALLAHAN 
English 



HAROLD COOKE 
Music 



FRED L. CURRAN 
Industrial Education 



HARRY F. GOOD 

Auto Mechanics 

Electrical 



DANIEL GREEN 
Machine Drafting 



H. M. HANSEN 
Advanced Woodwork 



LILLIAN JETER 

Clothing 

Related Arts 



FLOYD KEITH 

General Metal 

Sheet Metal 



LEON LASSERS 
Public Speaking 



MABEL LEEDOM 
Chemistry 



I. ERLE GRINNELL 
English 



ALICE S. HOUSTON 
Director of Nursery School 



HAZEL KEEFER 
Home Economics Education 



RAY KRANZUSCH 
Auto Mechanics 

Radio 
Home Mechanics 



MILDRED LAWTON 
Home Administration 



RUTH M. LUSBY 
Institutional Management 

















MARY McCALMONT 
Chemistry 



H. C. MILNES 

Machine Shop Practice 

Foundry Work 

Pattern Making 



P. C. NELSON 

Carpentry 

Visual Education 



MERLE M. PRICE 

History 

English 

Dean of Men 



BERNICE REYNOLDS 
Physical Education 



FRANCIS P. ROBINSON 
Education 



MYRNA MESLOW 
Home Economics Education 



MAMIE R. MUTZ 
Related Art 



GRACE PRICE 
Vocational Home Economics 



JESSE E. RAY 

Architectural Drafting 

Freehand Drawir.5 

Masonry 



C. L. RICH 

Mathematics 

Science 



BOYD C. SHAFER 

History 

Social Science 



F. E. TUSTISON 

Mathematics 

Science 



DOROTHY VERRELL 
Nursery School 



ROBERT L. WELCH 
Vocational Industrial Education 



ISABELLA WILLIAMS 
Biological Science 



B. M, FUNK 
Business Manager 



DR. JULIUS T. BLOM 
College Physician 



HAZEL VAN NESS 
Clothing 



LETITIA WALSH 
Home Economics Education 



RAY A. WIGEN 

Carpentry 

Painting and Decorating 

Woodwork 



LUELLA WRIGHT 
Home Economics Education 



GERTRUDE M. O'BRIEN 
Registrar 



THERESA STOLEN 
College Nurse 




** ** 












LILLIAN M. FROGGATT 
Library Administration 



ALETTA MONT1ETH 

Executive Secretary 

(1932-1934) 



MYRTLE STRAND 
Assistant Librarian 



R. B. ANTRIM 
Assistant Librarian 



HELEN B. STAVERLOK 
General Office Clerk 



CLARA YOHR 
Stenographer 



MARGARET SANTEE 

Executive Secretary 

(1934—) 

GWEN SURSDSEN 
Stenographer 

AGNES WINSTON 
Stenographer 

I. T. BURNS 
Chief Engineer 



GRACE M. DOW 
Director of Dormitories 




ENIORS 




EVELYN M. ALLEN 

Bessemer, Michigan 

Home Economics Club; M. A. P.i 

Y. W. C. A. 



SELMA M. ANDERSON 

Osseo, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Science 

Club; Y. W. C. A. 



HARRY A. BEACH 

Madison, Wisconsin 

Arts and Crafts, President. 



CLARENCE A. BERG 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



CLIFFORD E. BJORNSON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Y. M. C. A.; Arts and Crafts; 

Rifle Club. 




CARL J. BRENNER 

East Orange, New Jersey 

Stoutonia, Business Manager; 

Y. M. C. A. 



EVELYN M. ALVORD 
Appleton, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club; Hyperi- 
ons, President. 



STUART ANDERSON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

K. F. S.; M. A. P. 



CHARLES BEHRINGER 

Manitowoc, Wisconsin 

F. O. B. 



RALPH E. BETTERLEY 

Elmwood, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; K. F. S.; Band; 

Tower. 



DORIS E. BRADLEY 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Publications 

Board; Home Economics Club; 

Tower, Editor; S. M. A. 



MARION A. BROWN 

New Richmond, Wisconsin 

Philomathean; Home Economics 

Club; W. A. A.; Y. M. C. A. 



EDWARD F. BRESSLER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy. 



REUBEN CARP 
Charleston, West Virginia 
Stoutonia; F. O. B.; S. T. S. 



MARION CHASE 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philoma- 

thean; Y. W. C. A. 



ERNEST COROSOLLA 
Ironwood, Michigan 
F. O. B., President. 



LUCILLE F. DAMM 
Columbus, Wisconsin 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Hyperian. 



DAN E. DANIELSON 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin 




ROSAMOND CARLSON 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pallas 

Athene; Y. W. C. A.; Areme. 



LeROY CHARLICK 

Highland, Michigan 

Arts and Crafts; Y. M. C. A.; 

G. W. C. 



ELIZABETH CHRISTOPHERSON 
Superior, Wisconsin 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Science 
Club; Home Economics Club; 
Women's Glee Club; Pallas Ath- 
ene; Pegasus. 



FREDERICK L. CURRAN 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

K. F. S.; Band; Men's Glee Club; 

Epsilon Pi Tau. 



VERNA E. DAMM 

Columbus, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, President; 

Stoutonia; Hyperian. 



PAUL L. DAUGHERTY 
Boscobel, Wisconsin 






HELEN E. DIEDRICH 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; S. M. A.; S. S. A., 
Secretary. 




EUGENE W. DOYLE 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
President, Senior Class; Epsilon 
Pi Tau; F. O. B.; S. T. S. 




ALBERT I. FEIRER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin . 

M. A. P., President; Men's Glee 

Club; K. F. S. 




ROSE M. FORNO 
Bessemer, Michigan 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Pegasus, President; 
Hyperion; Science Club. 




JAMES L. GOVIN 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy. 



HARRIET V. GUNDERSON 

South Hibbing, Minnesota 

Pallas Athene; Stoutonia; Home 

Economics Club; Rifle Club; Y. 

W. C. A. 



RICHARD J. DIXON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Tower; S. T. S. 



LUELLA ERICKSON 

Virginia, Minnesota 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Pallas 

Athene, President; Science Club; 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. A. 



LUCILLE M.FLEMING 
Glenwood City, Wisconsin 
Women's Glee Club; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Y. W. C. A.; Band. 



HEINRICH GAERTNER 

Neenah, Wisconsin 

K. F. S. 



JANE GREEN 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A., President; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; Home Economics Club; 

Women's Glee Club; Orchestra; 

M. A. P. 



VIRGINIA L. GUNZ 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Y. M. C. 

A.; S. M. A. 



CARL J. HAASE 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Y. M. C. A.; S. T. S. 



PAUL B. HANSEN 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSalle; G. W. C. 




JANICE L. HENNING 

Fountain City, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Science 

Club; Pegasus. 



GEORGE B. HISLOP 
Racine, Wisconsin 
Stoutonia; K. F. S. 



EUNICE M. HOCKENBROCK 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pegasus; 

Hyperion. 



WOODRUS HORMAN 

Sleepy Eye, Minnesota 

Band, President; Metallurgy. 



ELWOOD V. HUGDAHL 

Bensonville, Illinois 

Forensic Society; Men's Glee 

Club; Orchestra. 



WARREN S. JACKSON 
Strum, Wisconsin 



DORIS H. JEFFERY 

Schullsburg, Wisconsin 

Philomathean; Areme, President; 

Y. W. C. A. 



GRACE JOHNSON 

Bessemer, Michigan 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Pegasus; 

Areme; S. M. A. 



HARRY E. KELLER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; Metallurgy; 

Publications Board; F. O. B. 



RAMONA A. KLATT 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; S. M. A. 






DICK G. KLATT 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



WALTER F. KUBACH 
Sandusky, Ohio 
Epsilon Pi Tau. 



CLARENCE T. LEDIN 
Superior, Wisconsin 
Y. M. C. A.; S. T. S. 



KARL T. LOHR 

Battle Creek, Michigan 

S. T. S., President; Young Wings; 

Arts and Crafts. 



BENJAMEN J. LOHRIE 

Elmwood, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; M. A. P.; Band. 



GERTRUDE L. LOTWIN 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Science Club. 



HELMER M. MARTINSON 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin 
Y. M. C. A.; G. W. C. 



RUSSELL W. MAY 

Downing, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy; Band; Y. M. C. A. 





CLARENCE McCLELLAN 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
M. A. P.; Metallurgy. 



G. IVAN MILLENBACH 
Chassell, Michigan 
Marquette-LaSalle. 




CORDELIA A. MOODY 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Women's 

Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. 



MARY LOUISE NIBBE 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club; Phi Upsi- 
lon Omicron; S. M. A.; W. A. A. 



ALICE M. NICHOLS 

Mount Hope, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philoma- 

thean; Y. W. C. A. 



PATRICK O'CONNOR 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSalle; F. O. B.; 

M. A. P. 



CHARLES R. PETERSON 
Rib Lake, Wisconsin 
Epsilon Pi Tau; S. S. A., Treasur- 
er; F. O. B. 



PAUL M. REINHARD 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau. 



CHARLES ROMINE 

Madison, Wisconsin 

Stoutonia; K. F. S.; M. A. P.; 

S. T. S. 



DELTA K. SCHROEDER 

Platteville, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philoma- 

thean. 



LEONARD OASS 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 





VIVIAN A. PATRICK 
Whitewater, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. A. 




LESTER G. PUHL 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

G. W. C. 




MARLYS R. RICHERT 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club, President; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; S. M. A. 



CHARLES W. ROWE 

Beloit, Wisconsin 

S. S. A., President; Arts and 

Crafts; K. F. S. 



FRANCIS B. SHAW 

Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 

Y. M. C. A. 





AMELIA SMILANICH 

Chisholm, Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; Stoutonia; 

Hyperion; Areme; Pegasus. 



HARRIET M. STEIN 

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philoma- 

thean; Stoutonia; Areme. 



MARY SWISTON 

Washburn, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Stoutonia; 

Hyperian; Pegasus; Science Club. 



HARLAND M. WOODWORTH 
Camino, California 
Epsilon Pi Tau, President; Publi- 
cations Board; K. F. S. 



DORR SNOYENBOS 

Mondavi, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; Tower; S. T. S. 



DOROTHY STRESE 
Durand, Wisconsin 
Philomathean, President; Phi Up- 
silon Omicron; Home Economics 
Club; Marquette-LaSalle; M. A. P. 



KATHER1NE WATSON 

Appleton, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. 

A.; W. A. A. 



LAWRENCE WOLSKI 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

M. A. P. 



Seniors whose pictures do not appear: 



CHARLES E. CRYDERMAN 
ERNEST R. EBERT 
WILBUR C. ENGEBRETSON 
LLOYD W. ERPENBACH 
HAL GILKER 
EDMUND HOERNAMAN 



selmer a. hollen 
frank l. judish 
eric f. lange 
erle v. lewis 
lucille e. Mclaughlin 
erling swenson 



UNIORS 




AMELIA SMILANICH 

Chisholm, Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; Stoutonia; 

Hyperian; Areme; Pegasus. 



DORR SNOYENBOS 

Mondovi, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; Tower; S. T. S. 



HARRIET M. STEIN 

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philoma- 

thean; Stoutonia; Areme. 



DOROTHY STRESE 

Durand, Wisconsin 

Philomathean, President; Phi Up- 

silon Omicron; Home Economics 

Club; Marquette-LaSalle; M. A. P. 



MARY SWISTON 

Washburn, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Stoutonia; 

Hyperian; Pegasus; Science Club. 



KATHERINE WATSON 

Appleton, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. 

A.; W. A. A. 



HARLAND M. WOODWORTH 
Camino, California 
Epsilon Pi Tau, President; Publi- 
cations Board; K. F. S. 



LAWRENCE WOLSKE 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

M. A. P. 



Seniors whose pictures do not appear: 



CHARLES E. CRYDERMAN 
ERNEST R. EBERT 
WILBUR C. ENGEBRETSON 
LLOYD W. ERPENBACH 
HAL GILKER 
EDMUND HOERNAMAN 



selmer a. hollen 
frank l. judish 
eric f. lange 
erle v. lewis 
lucille e. Mclaughlin 
erling swenson 



■* — 



to *■ 



ROBERT F. AINGER 

Genoa City,. Wisconsin 

Rifle Club, President; K. F. S. 



MARGARET E. ALLEN 

River Falls, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pallas 

Athene. 



*■** r 



■ | 



DOROTHY A. BAUN 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 

Pallas Athene. 



CLARENCE BEAUCHAMP 

Ironwood, Michigan 

Y. M. C. A. 



ORVETTA N. BRAKER 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Philomathean; Stoutonia; Wo- 
men's G lee Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
W. A. A. 



MERCEDA BRAUN 

Athens, Wisconsin 

Pegasus; S. M. A.; W. A. A. 



EVELYN K. BROWN 

New Richmond, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; W. A. A.; 

Women's Glee Club. 



LAWRENCE BRAATEN 

Elk Mound, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy; K. F. S. 



LEONARD A. BROWE 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club. 



RUTH E. BUBECK 

Cadott, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pallas 

Athene; Tower; M. A. P.; W. A. A. 



a * 



ELSA CARLSON 

Eveleth, Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; 

Y. W. C. A. 



DOROTHY DARLING 

Lindstrom, Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; W. A. A.; 

Philomathean. 



ZENDA DeRUBEIS 
Ironwood, Michigan 



BETTY ANN DOYLE 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Philo- 

mathean; Marquette-LaSalle; Y. 

W. C. A. 




JAMES R. EINUM 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

F. O. B. 



DORIS L. EPSTEIN 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Women's 

Glee Club. 



MARIE ERPENBACH 

Elk Mound, Wisconsin 

W. A. A.; Home Economics Club; 

Pallas Athene. 



ANN FULLER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Women's 

Glee Club; Pegasus; Hyperions. 



MARY C. FINNEY 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

"S. S. A., Vice President; Phi Up- 

.silon Omicron; Women's Glee 

Club; Philomathean. 



STEVE F. GIOVANNINI 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; Band; Y. M. C. 

A.; G. W. C. 



EDGAR A. GRACIE 

Nashwauk, Minnesota 

K. F. S„- Men's Glee Club. 



ROY V. GWYNN 
Mabscott, West Virginia 



MARGUERITE H. HANKWITZ 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 
Jiyperian, Secretary; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; W. A. A. 



LILLIAN C. HANSON 
Bayfield, Wisconsin 

Pallas Athene, Treasurer; Areme; 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. A. 




ERWIN D. HANSON 
Alexandria, Minnesota 
Arts and Crafts; Metallurgy; Ri- 
fle Club, Executive Officer. 



JACK P. HELLUM 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



DAYTON HOKENSTROM 

Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 

M. A. P. 



HUBERT H. HUBER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; Orchestra; 

Band. 



MARION C. KUBALEK 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pallas 

Athene; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. 



ADELAIDE R. LARSON 

Duluth, Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. 

A.; Orchestra. 



MARIE L. HANSON 

Racine, Wisconsin 

Hyperion; Areme; W. A. A.; Y. 

W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. 



MERLE M. HILL 

Arcadia, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C. A., Treasurer; Home 

Economics Club; Pallas Athene; 

Science Club. 



DOROTHY R. HOWISON 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Science 
Club; Rifle Club; Home Econom- 
ics Club. 



HARRY J. KUBALEK 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Tower, Associate Editor; Stouto- 

nia; Arts and Crafts; S. T. S. 



VIOLA LARSON 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Stoutonia, Editor-in-Chief; Phi 

Upsilon Omicron; Pallas Athene; 

Y. W. C. A. 



PHYLLIS M. LAUERMANN 

Alexandria, Minnesota 

Pallas Athene; Band; M. A. P.; 

Y. W. C. A.; Science Club; Home 

Economics Club. 



LEONARD W. LUNDELL 

Cloquet, Minnesota . 

K. F. S.; Young Wings'. 



FRED J. MAGAGNINI 
Virginia, Minnesota 




STELLA MEATH 

Cylon, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Women'! 

Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. 



DONALD R. MILLER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Young Wings; Tower; Stoutonia. 



IRMA A. MILLER 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Hyperian; M. A. P.; Pegasus; Y. 

W. C. A.; Women's Glee Club; 
Home Economics Club. 



HUGHITT G. MOLTZAU 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau; President, Junior 

Class; Y. M. C. A; K. F. S.; 

G. W. C. 




AGNES S. MULLEN 

Bloomer, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Stoutonia; 

Hyperian; W. A. A. 



RAGNA S. MULLEN 

Bloomer, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Stoutonia; 

Hyperian; W. A. A. 





MARIE M. MURRAY 

Antigo, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Pegasus; 

Areme; S. M. A. 



ANITA NELSON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Tower; Pegasus; S. M. A.; 

M. A. P. 



EUNICE A. NELSON 

Owen, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Women's 

Glee Club. 



WILLIAM E. OLSON 

Ironwood, Michigan 

Epsilon Pi Tau. 





LOUISE OWEN 

Downing, Wisconsin 

Young Wings, Editor; Stoutonia; 

M. A. P.; Philomathean. 




EVELYN I. PECK 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Women's Glee Club. 




FLORENCE B. RUESINK 

Hudson, Wisconsin 

Orchestra. 




MARINE R. SCHULTZ 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Women's 

Glee Club; Orchestra; Rifle Club; 

Home Economics Club. 



ROBERT V. SHERMAN 

Hibbing, Minnesota 

Aits and Crafts; Men's Glee 

Club. 



SIDNEY SKINNER 
Eveleth, Minnesota 
Men's Glee Club; Athletic Man- 
ager. 



LENORA J. PAULSON 

Carpio, North Dakota 

Hyperion; Women's Glee Club; 

Home Economics Club. 



INEZ D. PICKERING 

Ellendale, Minnesota 

Pallas Athene; Publications 

Board; Tower. 



DOROTHY L. SALZMANN 

Beecher, Illinois 

Philomathean, Women's Glee 

Club. 



HAROLD A. SCHULZ 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Arts and Crafts; Y. M. C. A. 



JOYCE A. SHAFER 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Philomathean; M. A. P.; Science 

Club; Women's Glee Club; Home 

Economics Club; Y. W. C. A. 



CATHERINE SKEELS 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Home 

Economics Club. 



ESTHER SPAULDING 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 
W. A. A., President; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Pallas Athene; Sci- 
ence Club; Y. W. C. A. 



AGNES E. STEINKE 
Baraboo, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. 

A.; Science Club; Pallas Athene; 
W. A. A. 



MYRTLE M. SW ANSON 

Stambaugh, Michigan 

Science Club; Home Economics 

Club; Y. W. C. A. 



ELAINE M. THOMAS 

Evansville, Wisconsin 

Pallas Athene; Home Economics 

Club; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; 

Science Club. 



KENNETH WATERS 

Shell Lake, Wisconsin 

Band. 



WILLIAM WIVELL 
Taconite, Minnesota 



HARRIETT A. STANTON 
Nashwauk, Minnesota 





CAROLYN F. STURMER 

Bloomington, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; 

Y. W. C. A. 




^» P 




MELFORD H. RUUD 

Madison, Wisconsin 

K. F. S. 




HARLEY VAN VALKENBURG 
Chetek, Wisconsin 




EDNA GRACE WEBB 

Virginia, Minnesota 

Women's Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; 

Home Economics Club. 



DOROTHY L. WOERTH 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Hyperion; Women's Glee Club; 

Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics 
Club. 



:the TOWER 



JUNIORS WHOSE PICTURES 
DO NOT APPEAR 



CHARLES G. ARNOLDT 



JANE M. COLE 



ARTHUR L. GAUVIN 



HAROLD E. BECKER 



MARY LOU FUNK 



WILLIS E. GIESE 



WALLACE O. HOUG 



JULIUS D. LONNHOLM 



ARVID J. STUBB 



THEODORE K. PIERSON 



EDWIN W. SIEFERT 



MAURICE N. TURNER 



GRANT K. VENNES 



JOHN S. WILLIAM 



Pcge Forty-six 



OPHOMORES 
and FRESHMEN 




SOPHOMORES 

EMILY ANDERSON 

HARVEY BAIER 

FLORENCE BECKER 



CAROL CHENOWETH 



MARY CURRAN 



DOROTHY DAVISON 




MARY DEE 



ELEANOR FLANAGAN 

JOHN FORTIN 



HELEN GOOD 



WAYNE GRIFFIN 



LOUIS HAMMERLY 



HARRY HENDRICKSON 

ERMA HERWIG 



VIRGINIA HIPKE 



VERNE JEWETT 



MABEL JOOS 



OLGA LAURICH 



DOROTHY LLOYD 



JANE MARTIN 



MILDRED MARTIN 



SOPHOMORES 



MARION MILLER 

H. JACK MILNES 



GERHARDT NEUBAUER 



VERNETTA NUTTER 

GORDON OLSON 



DOROTHY OMSTED 



ALLOUISE OVERBECK 

KIRBY PRICE 



KATHRYN RICE 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

BARBARA SAWYER 

MARGARET SJOLANDER 



RAYMOND SOMSEN 

ALLEN STEPHENS 



ELNER STEINER 



LOIS STYER 



DAVID THOMAS 



JAMES WOOD 











DARBY WORMAN 

CHARLES ZEILINGER 

MARION ZIERATH 












FRESHMEN 



DORIS ANDREWS 

LORRAINE AUSMAN 

MARIE AVERILL 



DORIS BAHLS 



KEIL BLANK 



NEIL BLANK 



PAUL BONDELIE 



WILLA BOIRE 



PALMER BREKKE 



VIRGINIA BRYANT 

DARVEY CARLSON 



ARDYS CHRISTIANSEN 



DOUGLAS CLAUSEN 

IRENE CHRISTOPHERSON 

GEORGIA DUESING 



THEA ESENSTAD 

NORMAN ERCKMANN 

ROY FOSTER 



STANLEY FOX 



HELEN GANTZER 



RUTH GOOD 



FRESHMEN 



LORENE GRASLIE 

JEANETTE HANSEN 



ANN HELLUM 



A1LEEN HUGHES 



THEA JEATRAN 



ALICE JILEK 



FANCHON JOHNSON 

GALEN KEES 



BETTY KEITH 



PAUL KEYES 



MARY ELLEN KLATT 

JOHN KUCHENBECKER 



EARL LAATSCH 



WILLIAM LEYHE 



LAWRENCE LINDGREN 



OSCAR LINDSTROM 

CHARLES LOTZ 



MARJORIE LULLOFF 



ROSEMARY LULLOFF 

HILDEGARDE LUTZE 

ADELINE MALM 






FRESHMEN 



PATRICIA MALY 



ARTHUR MATHER 



NEIL MAXWELL 



VELDA MILBROT 

HARRIET MILLIREN 



EILERT MOLDENHAUER 



RAY MORRISON 



MARY MUELLER 



ELEANORE NELSON 



EUGENE NEUBAUER 

EUGENIA NOWAK 



HARRY OLSTAD 



DELMAR OWEN 



ROBERT PLUTSHACK 

ROSALYN POTTER 



JANE QUILLING 



SARA QUILLING 



ALMA RAUSCH 



VAUN RICHERT 



NORMA ROWE 



MARGARET RIGGERT 



FRESHMEN 



HELEN ROBINSON 

ROSELLA SCHILL 



HARRIET SCHNITZER 



MADELINE SCOTT 

JUNE SMITH 



FRANCES SNIVELY 



MARGARET STALLMAN 

MARJORIE STEINER 



ANDREAS STOLEN 



LEO STYER 



RUTH TALCOTT 



ELIZABETH TRETTIN 



EDNA VOIGHT 



EARL VOLP 



BETTY WEBB 



DAVID WILSON 



DELMAR WINNING 




:the tower 



Sophomores Whose Pictures Do 
Not Appear 



Harvey Adams 
Clarence Arnston 
Agdur Barbo 
Rena Borland 
Lowell Brown 
Peter Christianson 
Myrtle Colter 
Elliot Crego 
Joseph Dolejs 
Franklin Duda 
Norman Erckmann 
Bernice Gebhart 
Robert Gregg 
Jack Helium 
Marion Herpst 
Jay Holman 



Mary Jane Kelley 
Hugh Keown 
Franklin MacMiller 
James McLeod 
Viggo Nelson 
Lorraine Neverdahl 
Eugenia Nowack 
Harriet Olson 
Homer Pence 
Margery Price 
Robert Roberts 
William Sand 
Harold Schultz 
Vincent Trettin 
Loretta Zastrow 



Freshman Whose Pictures Do Not Appear 



Ward Bakken 
George Berge 
Florence Boehlke 
William Broker 
Ardis Brown 
Agnes Friedl 
Oscar Gronseth 
Thomas Hall 
Pedro Henderson 
Kenneth Johnson 
Calvin Karlen 
George Knutson 
Allen Kuester 
Walter La Tondresse 
Gordon McCullock 
Norman Miller 
Rodney Nelson 



John Roang 
Arlene Roen 
Allen Samdahl 
Lucille Saecker 
Allan Samdahl 
Marvin Sawyer 
Clarence Shabacker 
Elliott Selves 
Bernice Smith 
Charles Vasey 
Roy Vincent 
Vernon Vincent 
Gordon Von Gonten 
Maurice Webert 
Kenneth Weisman 
Neil Zeug 



Page Fifty-foui 





uJr/k 




1 ^w Il v Jit 


\r A 




mm* 






'«! 







CP^ 1 



we£K 



^to 



W&* 



THIRTY-FIVE 




CHARLES ROWE President 

MARY FINNEY Vice President 

HELEN DIEDRICH Secretary 

CHARLES PETERSON Treasurer 

STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

UPON completion of enrollment at The Stout Institute, every student auto- 
matically becomes a member of the Stout Student Association. The 
specific duties of this organization are an amplification of a major pur- 
pose, "to encourage a spirit of school co-operation and to secure for the student 
a definite and responsible voice in student affairs." The officers of the associa- 
tion act as representatives of student opinion before the joint faculty-student 
committee. 

During the past year the S. S. A. was particularly interested in four new 
problems: the installation of student representation on the Lyceum Committee; 
the attainment of strictly student assemblies; the revision of the extra-curricular 
point system; and the improvement in the weekly programs of student organiza- 
tions. 

Charles Rowe, S. S. A. President 



Page Fifty-seven 



:THE TOWER 



THE STUDENT AFFAIRS 
COMMITTEE 

THE Committee on Student Affairs was created by the President during the 
year 1930-1931. It replaced the former committees on college govern- 
ment and on student social activities. The membership of the committee 
is indicated in the annual catalog. 

This committee is charged with three specific functions: 1. to interpret stu- 
dent affairs in terms of institutional significance; 2. to suggest institutional policy 
on student affairs to the administration; and, 3. to counsel with the Student Ad- 
visory Council. 

The Committee on Student Affairs joins with the officers of the Stout Student 
Association to form a Joint Committee on Student Affairs. This joint committee 
receives student recommendations, petitions, and problems; with the President, 
decides on the apportionment of S. S. A. monies; handles the scheduling of social 
affairs and the issuance of guest slips; checks the scholastic record of all or- 
ganization members; and generally supervises the extra-curricular program of 
the college. 

The Committee on Student Affairs, or the joint committee, has achieved some 
tangible results. Standards for social organizations have been established and 
a method set up whereby social groups may gain official recognition on the 
campus. A new extra-curricular point system has been outlined for a more 
satisfactory regulation of the extra-curricular activity of the student. Three 
honorary fraternities have been recognized and are contributing to the college: 
Phi Upsilon Omicron, honorary fraternity in Home Economics; Epsilon Pi Tau, 
honorary fraternity in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education; and Alpha Psi 
Omega, honorary fraternity in dramatics. The S. S. A. constitution has also been 
entirely revised. The Student Handbook has been published biennially. 

By authority of the Committee on Student Affairs, the Student Publications 
Board was established to center control of and responsibility for all student pub- 
lications. The membership of the board is indicated in the handbook. 

The men members of the joint committee, plus two elected men students, 
also act as the committee in charge of the Men's Club Room. The S. S. A. 
president serves as chairman. 

In practice the committee is essentially a policy-determining group. Most 
of the work of the committee is delegated to the Dean of Men, the Dean of 
Women, and the S. S. A. president. 

The whole purpose of the Committee on Student Affairs is to co-ordinate the 
extra-curricular work of the college and to afford specific channels by which 
students and faculty may best direct student life. 

M. M. Price. 



Page Fifty-eighi 




HE PRESS 



:the tower 




DORIS BRADLEY 



JOHN FEIRER 



THE TOWER 



IN presenting the 1935 Tower to you who have lived with Stout, we are giving 
you to yourselves. Every class, every game, every dance is an expression 
of you. A Tower staff merely serves as a clearing-house to which these ex- 
pressions come for assemblage and assortment. No less, the spirit of progress 
which has guided our publication of a yearbook embracing new and unusual 
features has been inspired by you. 

It has been a lark, this opportunity to study your hearts, minds, and spirits, 
and thereby to become acquainted with your ideals and interests. If we have 
been able to preserve for you the vitality, the vigor, and the variety which we 
found in you, then we know the joy of an artist who has succeeded in capturing 
in his paintings all the elusive qualities which characterize his subject. 



Page Sixty 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Second row: H. Kubalek, D. Millar, J. Feirer, D. Snoyenbos, D. Thomas. 
First row: R. Bubeck, A. Smilanich, D. Bradley, A. Nelson. 



THE STAFF 



DORIS BRADLEY - - Editor 

HARRY KUBALEK Associate Editor 

JOHN FEIRER Business Manager 

RICHARD DIXON Advertising Manager 

ANITA NELSON ------ Literary Editor 

RUTH BUBECK Feature Editor 

DORR SNOYENBOS > _ 

r - - - - - - Organizations 

AMELIA SMILANICH \ ^ 

RALPH BETTERLY > , . , , 

INEZ PICKERING \ ****** 

DAVID THOMAS > 

LORENE GRASLIE j 

DORIS EPSTEIN Typist 

MISS CALLAHAN ) 

, „ _ . ,,__ f ...... Advisers 

MR. BAKER S 



Page Sixty-one 



THIRTY-FIVE 




T 



Third row: H. Wood-worth , I. Feirer, C. Brenner, L. Lundell. 

Second row: Mr. Baker, G. Hislop, H. Keller, Mr. Grinnell. 

First row: Miss Callahan, D. Bradley, H. Robinson, I. Pickering, V. Larson, L. Owen, Miss Jeter. 

PUBLICATIONS BOARD 

HE Publications Board is composed of the editors, business managers, and 
advisers of the student publications, and an elected student representa- 
tive from each of the four classes. 



It is the work of the Publications Board to govern the policies of the Tower, 
the college yearbook; the Stoutonia, the college newspaper; and Young Wings, 
the college literary magazine. 

MEMBERSHIP 

MISS IETER Student Affairs Committee 

MISS CALLAHAN 1 

DORIS BRADLEY I Tower Staff 

JOHN FEIRER J 

MR. BAKER 1 

VIOLA LARSON I e* • c « 

GEORGE HISLOP j ~ " " ' Stoutonia Staff 

CARL BRENNER J 

MR. GRINNELL *| 

LOUISE OWEN )■ - - - Young Wings Staff 

LEONARD LUNDELL J 

HARRY KELLER I <: ■ ri 

HARLAND WOODWORTH \ ' ' iemor Uiass 

INEZ PICKERING Junior Class 

DOROTHY LLOYD Sophomore Class 

HELEN ROBINSON Freshman Class 



Page Sixty-three 



:THE TOWER 



Xi ȣ**'* 



Third row: W. Giese, N. Blank, C. Brenner, K. Blank, H. Kubalek. 

Second row: A. Mullen, M. Klatt, H. Stein, G. Hislop, H. Gunderson, A. Smilanlch, O. Broker. 

First row: V. Damm, F. Johnson, R. Mullen, M. Swiston, V. Larson, L. Owen, R. Bubeck, J, Martin- 

THE STOUTONIA 

COLLEGE news is brought to the student body through the Stoutonia, week- 
ly newspaper. 

The impression of Lord Bryce that "the ability of a journalist is shown 
not so much in following and heightening the sentiment of a movement, as in 
presaging the course which any sentiment is just beginning to take" has 
guided the Stoutonia's policies of leadership with respect to problems and im- 
provements of a schoolwide nature. Thirty staff members concentrate their 
efforts toward building up a paper of high journalistic and typographical char- 
acter. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

VIOLA LARSON Editor-in-Chief 

GEORGE HISLOP • Managing Editor 

D. MILLAR Sports Editor 

HARRIET GUNDERSON .--... Headwriter 

DOUGLAS CLAUSEN Proofreader 

HAL GILKER ) _ t ,, . t . t 

OSCAR EMBRETSON \ bta " Amsw 

REPORTERS: Orvetta Broker, Ruth Bubeck, Verna Damm, Franklin Duda, 
Willis Giese, Carl Haase, Mary Ellen Klatt, Harry Kubalek, Agnes Mullen, 
Ragna Mullen, Viggo Nelson, Louise Owen, Katherine Rice, Mary Swiston, 
Harriet Stein. 

BUSINESS STAFF 

CARL BRENNER Business Manager 

KEIL BLANK Asst. Business Manager 

NEIL BLANK Circulation Manager 

FANCHON JOHNSON - - - Asst. Circulation Manager 



Page Sixty-two 



:the tower 



YOUNG WINGS 



YOUNG WINGS, the literary magazine of Stout, made its third annual appearance in late Feb- 
ruary this year. It held again this year to an ideal of uniform excellence in content. Contests 
open to all students except members of the staff were held in December. Winners were 
selected in several fields of writing and in cover design. Clifford Bjomson designed the 
prize-winning cover. The best poem was "Sea Moods," submitted by Thea Jeatran. It appeared 
in Young Wings, skillfully illustrated by David Thomas, art editor for the 1935 Young Wings. 

The contest winning short stories were "Team Standing .000" by Don Millar in the short-story 
class, and "Dang Good Feller," by Joyce Shafer in the short short-story class. Prize winning prose 
pieces were done by Orvetta Broker with "Dish-wiping" and by Mary Virginia Hipke with "Lose 
Not Thy Faith." Louise Owen was editor. She also enjoys the distinction of having had work in 
all three issues of the magazine. Karl Lohr profited by his experience as business and mechanical 
editor in 1934 to put together an attractive magazine this year. Leonard Lundell had direction of 
business details for the 1935 Young Wings. 

Partly to stimulate literary activity at Stout and partly to show the world that Stout had skills 
outside of the practical arts Young Wings was conceived in the early winter of 1932-33. The first 
issue was sponsored by the Stoutonia, named by Violette Bussy '33, and appeared late in the 
Spring. It contained forty-eight pages and was enthusiastically received by students, alumni, and 
others. More than fifty students and alumni contributed to its pages. The invocation began, "With 
some diffidence we venture into a field of expression hitherto untried at Stout." The venture more 
than justified the hopes of those who gave their devoted attentions to it. Paul Doyle was editor by 
virtue of being editor of the Stoutonia. The poetry of Carmen Spreiter was widely applauded. Copies 
were sent to alumni, state officers, high schools, and interested friends. 

A generally higher level of competence was reached in the 1934 Young Wings. The magazine 
was reduced in size and number of pages, and much excellent copy had to be excluded. It was 
believed by the editors and in many other quarters it was contended that the poetry represented an 
unusually high level of college achievement. It also aroused a great deal of favorable comment 
from people who received copies. An editorial note in the Wisconsin Educational Journal praised the 
work as offering "a good hour's entertainment." 

Louise Owen, the editor, and Leonard Lundell, the business manager, for the 1935 Young Wings 
were selected by the Student Publications Board in the Spring of 1934. Accordingly it was possible 
to start active work somewhat earlier in the year than formerly. Douglas Clausen, Eleanor Flanagan, 
Janice Henning, and Viggo Nelson were appointed as associates, Karl Lohr was named mechanical 
editor, and Dave Thomas was asked to illustrate the magazine. Funds were subscribed by the 
Stout Student Association to de'fray a part of the cost, so that copies could be distributed without 
charge to all students. As in previous years, copies were sent by the college to alumni, to members 
of the Board of Trustees, and to others. 

A further reduction in number of pages (to thirty this time), made it imperative that the editors 
use extreme care in making commitments. Many excellent manuscripts had to be held over for another 
year. It was possible, however, to include several short stories of unquestionable merit and varied 
appeal; a group of essays and sketches, touching on humor and the gravity of college life and 
the world outside; and a few poems illustrating conventional and experimental forms. The book 
is illustrated with deftness and imagination by Dave Thomas, whose art has won many admirers 
at Stout. 

Young Wings has dispelled the popular fallacy that Stout students find interest and have 
abilities almost exclusively in vocational lines. They have proved in three successive years that 
they possess imaginations and faculties for clear and forceful expression. Life to them is ex- 
perienced as vibrantly and written of as vividly as it is in other less technical colleges. Young 
Wings has been the medium through which hitherto supposedly inarticulate students have given 
expression to their dreams and fancies, their quest for reality and romance, their self-communings 
and discoveries. 

— J. Erie Grinnell. 



Page Sixty-four 



1 



ONORARY 



:t H E 



TOWER 




Third row: B. Christopherson, M. Richert, D. Stress, I. Pickering, H. Diedrich, D. Bradley, L. Erickson. 
Second row: Miss Wright, V. Larson, G. Johnson, M. Finney, Mrs. Meslow, M. Nibbe, Mrs. Houston. 
First row: V. Damm, R. Forno, M. Swiston, L. Damm, J. Henning, G. Lotwin, J. Green. 

PHI UPSILON OMICRON 

PHI UPSILON OMICRON is a national professional fraternity for Home Eco- 
nomics women, with twenty active and seven elusive chapters in various 
colleges of the United States. Tau chapter was installed at The Stout 
Institute in March, 1932. Election to the organization is open to high ranking 
scholastic and socially adaptable Home Economics students in the senior divi- 
sions of the college. 

The purpose of the organization is to promote intensive studies of profes- 
sional work in Home Economics and to further the social and intellectual de- 
velopment of the group members. 

In addition to the study program of its regular meetings, Tau Chapter is 
undertaking a number of professional projects, such as awarding a scholarship 
to an outstanding Freshman woman in Stout, and assembling illustrative material 
which may be lent to teachers in the field of Home Economics. 

VERNA DAMM President 

LUELLA ERICKSON Vice President 

ELIZABETH CHRISTOPHERSON Secretary 

ROSE FORNO Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

MISS MICHAELS .... Dean of Home Economics 

MRS. HOUSTON - - Gamma Chapter, Ohio State University 

MRS. MESLOW - - Alpha Chapter, University of Minnesota 

MISS WRIGHT - - Omicron Chapter, Iowa State University 

CLASS OF 1935 

DORIS BRADLEY GRACE JOHNSON 

BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON MARLYS RICHERT 

LUCILLE DAMM MARY SWISTON 

JANICE HENNING LUELLA ERICKSON 

MARY LOUISE NIBBE ROSE FORNO 

VERNA DAMM JANE GREEN 

HELEN DIEDRICH GERTRUDE LOTWIN 

VIOLA LARSON DOROTHY STRESE 

CLASS OF 1936 

MARY FINNEY INEZ PICKERING 



Page Sixty-six 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Third row: Mr. Wiggen, M. Giese, C. Peterson, E. Doyle, Mr. Bowman. 
Second row: J. McLeod, W. Olson, H. Moltzau, Mr. Good, W. Kubach, 
First row: P. Reinhard, R. Betterley, H. Woodworth, Mr. Ray, Mr. Price, Mr. Nelson. 

EPSILON PI TAU 

EPSILON PI TAU is a national honorary fraternity in Industrial Arts and 
Vocational-Industrial Education for qualified junior and senior men. Theta 
Chapter is located at The Stout Institute. 

The ideals of Epsilon Pi Tau are: to recognize the place of skill in Industrial 
Arts and Vocational-Industrial Education; to promote social efficiency; and to 
foster, reward, and publish the results of research effort in the fields of its in- 
terest. 

During the past year the professional work of the local chapter concerned 
itself with surveys in connection with the Co-operative Field Service inaugurated 
between certain Wisconsin cities, the State Department of Education, and the 
School of Industrial Education at The Stout Institute. 

HARLAND WOODWORTH President 

RALPH BETTERLY Vice President 

EUGENE DOYLE Secretary-Treasurer 

MR. BOWMAN Adviser 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

MR. CURRAN MR. WELCH 

MR. NELSON MR. GOOD 

MR. BROWN MR. RAY 

MR. PRICE MR. WIGGEN 

CLASS OF 1935 

RALPH BETTERLY HARLAND WOODWORTH 

CHARLES PETERSON PAUL REINHARD 

FREDERICK CURRAN EUGENE DOYLE 
WALTER KUBACH 

CLASS OF 1936 

HUGHITT MOLTZAU WILLIAM OLSON 

WILLIS GIESE 

CLASS OF 1937 

IAMES McLEOD 



Page Sixty-seven 



:THE TOWER 




Top row: Eugene Doyle, Verna Damm, John Feirer. 
Bottom row: Dorothy Baun, Mabel loos, Dorothy Lloyd. 



HONOR AWARDS 

DURING commencement week four Eichelberger scholarships of one hun- 
dred dollars each are presented to two women and two men of the 
Sophomore and Junior classes. The awards are based upon scholastic 
records, personality, promise of achievement, social attitudes and accomplish- 
ments, and services to the school. Those students receiving scholarships in 
June, 1934, were Verna Damm, Dorothy Baun, Frederick Curran, and John Feirer. 

Two organizations in The Stout Institute also give honor awards, on the 
basis of scholastic attainment and character. Dorothy Lloyd received the Phi 
Upsilon Omicron scholarship and Mabel Joos the Philomathean scholarship. 



Page Sixty-eight 



M 



USIC 



THE TOWER 



WHO SHALL DEVOTE 
HIMSELF TO MUSIC 

THE study of music need not necessarily be limited to those who are able 
to play an instrument or sing a song. What is music? The Herbartian 
school of psychology has attempted to prove that the beauty of sound, 
and its attendant sensations, forms the working basis of musical art. From this 
theory it would appear that mind is not so important a factor in music. Various 
sensations of sound are, no doubt, of value in the study of music appreciation, but 
if this is all we need to consider, what of the men who have written and inter- 
preted music— how were they able to hear their music before it was written or 
played? Mere senuous excitement from tone might be sufficient for a super- 
ficial appreciation of a concert, but it would be entirely inadequate as a method 
or process in education. 

We cannot all hope to be musical geniuses, but the musical faculty is pres- 
ent in all human beings; it has not been assigned to a select group. Each of us 
is endowed with the same kind of faculties as the rest of mankind, notwithstand- 
ing that these faculties may vary in the degree of efficiency and development. 
All of us have the capacity for learning arithmetic, language, business, literature, 
history, etc., but not everyone will develop mastery in each of these subjects. 
W. H. Cummings, principal of the Guildhall School of Music, London, says, 
"Not all people can be great musicians, but children are born with the musical 
faculty as well as with pairs of eyes_ and legs ... If children are not taught to 
make good use of the faculties which God has given them, it is not a very wonder- 
ful thing that these same faculties, instead of improving, should become almost 
non-existent." 

What then is the real pre-requisite in the study of music? First in importance 
is intelligence and a capacity for and a willingness to work. Second is appreci- 
ation of the fact that the ability to perform either instrumentally or vocally is 
not as important a matter as the desire to acquire knowledge and understand- 
ing. Those of us who do not show instrumental ability should remember that 
some of our truly greatest musicians were and are poor performers. A knowl- 
edge of the working devices, the tools, the history, the aesthetic and poetic as 
well as the analytic and theoretic sides of music are matters of far greater im- 
portance than the the study of the fingering of a bass horn or saxophone. Let him 
devote himself to music who is interested in the cultural and broadening in- 
fluences that this greatest of arts provides. Let us dismiss from our minds the 
words genius, talent, and hereditary background, and turn to music with the same 
amount of enthusiasm and courage as we would to any other study. We shall 
not all turn out to be Beethovens or Wagners, but if through application we can 
be introduced to a few of the seemingly hidden mysteries of sound through the 
study of harmony, counterpoint, theory, dynamics, and composition, our lives 
will have been enriched, and our appreciation of the truly great thing in music 
will have been more fully realized. 

— Harold Cooke. 



Page Seventy 



THIRTY-FIVE 




THE STOUT INSTITUTE BAND 

WOODRUS HORMAN ....... President 

HARRY HENDRICKSON Vice President 

VERNE JEWETT Secretary-Treasurer 

RUSSELL MAY Librarian 

VINCENT TRETTIN Assistant Librarian 

ADVISERS 

MR. COOKE MR. RAY 

CLARINETS 

HOMER PENCE LEO WALLNER THEODORE PIERSON 

WOODRUS HORMAN EILERT MOLDENHAUER BETTY WEBB 

LUCILLE FLEMING BENJAMIN LOHRIE EDWARD CASE 

SAXOPHONES 

CHARLES ARNOLDT FLORENCE BECKER WALLACE HOUG 

KENNETH WATERS ARDYS CHRISTIANSON PHYLLIS LAUERMANN 

EARL LEWIS WAYNE GRIFFIN 

ALTO 

FREDERICK CURRAN FRANCIS GRIFFETH VERNE JEWETT 

BARITONE 

MABEL JOOS 

TRUMPETS 

HARRY KELLER HARRY HENDRICKSON LAURENCE LINDGREN 

RUSSELL MAY MR. RAY BERNIE BEGUHN 

DANIEL GREEN OSCAR GRONSETH 

TROMBONES 

STANLEY FOX CLAIRE KNUTSON RUDOLPH ROEN 

ERWIN ENGLI HOWARD ROEN 

TUBA 

STEVE GIOVANNINI MAURICE WEBER LEONARD BROWE 

CHARLES HARMON OSCAR LINDSTROM 

PERCUSSION 

VINCENT TRETTIN RALPH BETTERLY HARLEY VAN VALKENBURG 

HUGH KEOWN 

COLOR GUARDS 

KEIL BLANK NEIL BLANK WALTER LaTONDRESSE 

MALCOLM McCULLOCH 

DRUM MAJOR 

VERNE JEWETT 



Paqo Seventy-one 



:the tower 





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Third row: E. Lewis", D. Snoyenbos, H. Hendrickson, G. Volp, R. Larson, P. Brekke, H. Huber, S. Anderson, 

J. Milnes, E. Volp. 
Second row: H. Keller, S. Giovannini, E. Hugdahl, S. Fox, P. Hansen, E. Grade, L. Wolske, W. Houg, 

K. Blank, S. Skinner, E. Neubauer. 
First row: L. Browe, Mr. Good, C. Lotz, A. Feirer, Director H. E. Cooke, F. Curran, H. VanValkenburg, 

R. Betterley, W. LaTondresse, Mr. Ray. 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



THE Men's Glee Club endeavors to develop, through study and perform- 
ance, a finer appreciation of the best in music. It also recognizes the de- 
mand for teachers who possess, in addition to the qualifications in their 
specialized fields, the ability to direct musical activities. 

Radio broadcasts, concert tours, and community entertainment are all 
part of the glee club's calendar. Everywhere the group is greeted by enthusiastic 
audiences. Students and faculty members value the splendid work which these 
men do, and are proud to send them on their concert tours as representatives of 
The Stout Institute. 



MR. COOKE 

DORR SNOYENBOS - 

EDGAR GRACIE 


- Director RALPH BETTERLY - - - President 

- Business Manager FREDERICK CURRAN - - - Treasurer 

Secretary ALBERT FEIRER Librarian 




FIRST TENOR 






HARRY KELLER 
PAUL HANSEN 
PALMER BREKKE 


JACK MILNES 
THEODORE PIERSON 
MR. GOOD 

SECOND TENOR 




EDGAR GRACIE 
ERLE LEWIS 
ROY LARSON 


HARRY HENDRICKSON 
ERNEST EBERT 
FREDERICK CURRAN 


RALPH BETTERLY 

EARL VOLP 

HARLEY VAN VALKENBURG 


GLEN VOLP 
MR. RAY 




FIRST BASS 






EL WOOD HUGDAHL 
ROBERT SHERMAN 
STANLEY FOX 


ALBERT FEIRER 
HUBERT HUBER 
STEWART ANDERSON 

SECOND BASS 




CHARLES LOTZ 
STEVE GIOVANNINI 


BENJAMIN LOHRIE 
WALLACE HOUG 
DORR SNOYENBOS 


EUGENE NEUBAUER 
LAWRENCE WOLSKE 




SIDNEY SKINNER 
LEONARD BROWE 



Page Seventy-two 



THIRTY-FIVE 




WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



IRMA MILLER .... . . President 

ANN FULLER Secretary 

EMILY ANDERSON ....... Treasurer 

MARY LOU FUNK - Accompanist 

MR - COOKE " .... Director 

FIRST SOPRANO 

BETTY KEITH MARY CURRAN EVELYN PECK 

FLORENCE RUESINK MARINE SCHULTZ ELEANORE NELSON 

* ENA BORLAND ANNE HELLUM DOROTHY DAvTsON 

uf2X^™„ T MARJORIE LULLOFF HILDEGARDE LUTZE 

MARIE AVERILL EUNICE NELSON MRS LASSERS 

HELEN ROBINSON LAbbhrto 

SECOND SOPRANO 

JEANETTE HANSON ARLENE ROEN CORDELIA MOODY 

BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON MYRTLE COLTER LOIS STYER 

mi™ ™n NG EMILY ANDE RSON ANN FULLER 

m^?££ D qvm ,Mno D ALICE IILEK MISS VERRELL 

MARGARET SJOLANDER IRMA MILLER FLORENCE BECKTR 

MARY LOUISE NIBBE LUCILE FLEMING OLIVE HYLLAND 

FIRST ALTO 

nS™ HARRIET STANTON DOROTHY SALZM AN 

™™*™S K MADALINE SCOTT MARY ELLEN KLATT 

™™™ ^ ABEL IOOS DOROTHY WOERTH 

STELLA MEATH MARY FINNEY BERNICE GEBHART 

LENORA PAULSON EVELYN BROWN MISS REYNOLDS 

SECOND ALTO 

^mp^rttm* HELEN GOOD PATRICIA MALEY 

T^fa Vr ™ kt IOYCE SHAFER EDNA GRACE WEBB 

THEA JEATRAN HARRIET OLSON BARBARA SAWYER 



Page Seventy-three 



:the TOWER 





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THE STOUT STRING ENSEMBLE 

THE Stout String Ensemble is composed of students who wish to develop 
in themselves the ability to recognize and appreciate music of the high- 
est quality, and who desire to foster the same development of recognition 
and appreciation in Stout students. The objectives of the ensemble are realized 
through frequent rehearsals, a school concert, and the contribution of musical 
selections for M. A. P. productions. 

ELWOOD HUGDAHL ------ President 

ADELAIDE LARSON Vice President 

MARINE SCHULTZ Secretary 

LOUIS HAMERLY Librarian 

DIRECTOR 

MR. COOKE 

VIOLIN 

ELWOOD HUGDAHL VIRGINIA JENSEN 

MARINE SCHULTZ ADELAIDE LARSON 

LOUIS HAMERLY FLORENCE BECKER 

VIOLA 

HUBERT HUBER 

VIOLONCELLO 

FLORENCE RUESINK PEGGY DOCKAR 

ALMA RAUSCH 

BASS 

BENJAMIN LOHRIE 

PIANO 

DR. HARRINGTON 



Page Seventy-four 




OCIAL 



:t h e 



TOWER 




Third row: B. Christopherson, M. Hill, I. Pickering, H. Gunderson, L. Hanson, E. Spaulding. 

Second row: D. Lloyd, E. Thomas, L. Erickson, D. Baun, Miss Lusby, V. Larson. 

First row: R. Carlson, A. Steinke, P. Loruermann, E. Herwig, R. Bubeck, Mrs. LaPointe. 

PALLAS ATHENE 

THE Pallas Athene Society is the newest of the women's social groups, hav- 
ing been formed in 1934 in response to a distinct need for a fourth or- 
ganization of this nature. 

The name Pallas Athene, having its origin in Greek mythology, signifies the 
goddess of wisdom, science and the arts. 

The purpose of the society is to encourage scholarship, culture, and fellow- 
ship. The yearly program includes business, cultural and social meetings, as 
well as numerous social activities. 

LUELLA ERICKSON - President 

INEZ PICKERING ..--... Vice President 

DOROTHY LLOYD Secretary 

LILLIAN HANSON ' - Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MISS LUSBY MRS. LaPOINTE 

CLASS OF 1935 

HARRIET GUNDERSON LUELLA ERICKSON 

BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON ROSAMOND CARLSON 

VIOLA LARSON 

CLASS OF 1936 

MERLE HILL AGNES STEINKE 

ELAINE THOMAS INEZ PICKERING 

PHYLLIS LAUERMANN RUTH BUBECK 

LILLIAN HANSON ESTHER SPAULDING 
DOROTHY BAUN 

CLASS OF 1937 

ERMA HERWIG DOROTHY LLOYD 



Page Seyenty-i 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Third row: D. Bradley, M. Richert, E. Anderson, H. Diedrich, V. Gunz. 

Second row: M. Herpst, G. Johnson, M. Nibbe, M. Braun, M. Murray, Mra. Carter. 

First row: I. Green, Miss Jeter, A. Nelson, M. Curran, R. Klatt, H. Good. 

S. M. A. 

THE S. M. A. Society is a group of Home Economics students organized for 
the purpose of establishing intimate association between women of 
similar interests and ideals. For the achievement of this aim the group 
has conceived a program featuring variety in culture and entertainment: nu- 
merous social meetings and diversions, encouragement of high scholastic rec- 
ords, active participation in school activities with other organizations, and zeal- 
ous co-operation within the group in presenting an annual art exhibit of school- 
wide and city-wide appeal. 

IANE GREEN President 

GRACE JOHNSON Secretary 

MARY LOUISE NIBBE ...... Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MISS JETER MRS. JOHN CARTER 

CLASS OF 1935 

DORIS BRADLEY RAMONA KLATT 

HELEN DIEDRICH GRACE JOHNSON 

JANE GREEN MARY LOUISE NIBBE 

VIRGINIA GUNZ MARLYS RICHERT 

CLASS OF 1936 

MERCEDA BRAUN MARIE MURRAY 

MARION HERPST ANITA NELSON 

CLASS OF 1937 

EMILY ANDERSON HELEN GOOD 

MARY CURRAN ELEANOR FLANAGAN 



Page Seventy-seven 



:the tower 




Third row: D. Darling, O. Braker, M. Finney, J. Shafer, E. Steiner, D. Schroeder. 
Second row: Miss Lawton, B. Doyle, H. Stein, A. Nichols, D. Salzman, D. Jeffery. 
First row: M. McEachron, M. Chase, D. Strese, D. Omsted, L. Owen, Mrs. Wilson. 

PHILOMATHEANS 

THE Philomathean Literary Society, organized in 1920, has a fourfold pur- 
pose: to establish closer bonds of friendship among its members; to pro- 
mote the social interests of the college; to further the love of higher learn- 
ing; and to develop an appreciation for the best in literature, music, and art. 

The aim "to further the love of higher learning" extends beyond the society 
itself. Each year the organization presents a Freshman girl with a scholarship, 
earned entirely through the efforts of the members. 

The Philomatheans join the other societies in sponsoring the annual Mid- 
Winter Ball; and, in addition, carry on a social program of their own. 



DOROTHY STRESE 
DELTA SCHROEDER 
DORIS JEFFERY 
DOROTHY DARLING 

MISS LAWTON 



DOROTHY STRESE 
DORIS JEFFERY 
ALICE NICHOLS 
DELTA SCHROEDER 



MARY FINNEY 
BETTY ANN DOYLE 
ORVETTA BRAKER 
LOUISE OWEN 

DOROTHY OMSTED 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



ADVISERS 



MRS. PAUL WILSON 



CLASS OF 1935 



MARION BROWN 
MARIAN CHASE 
HARRIET STEIN 



CLASS OF 1936 



MARIAN McEACHRON 
DOROTHY DARLING 
JOYCE SCHAFER 
DOROTHY SALZMAN 



CLASS OF 1937 



ELNER STEINER 



Page Seventy-eight 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Third row: A. Smilanich, A. Mullen, I. Miller, A. Fuller, E. Alvord, E. Hockenbrock. 

Second row: Miss Wright, M. Swiston, M. Hankwitz, M. Sjolander, M. Hipke, M. Hanson, Mrs. Davison. 

First row: V. Damm, R. Forno, R. Mullen, D. Davison, L. Damm, V. Nutter, J. Martin. 



HYPERIANS 



THE Hyperian Society has been an active group in The Stout Institute since 
1923. The aims of the society are to encourage high scholarship, to fur- 
ther social life among its members, and to carry on social service work 
in the community. 

The program of social service includes sending two children to nursery 
school each year, and sponsoring an annual Berea Exhibit. 

The chief attractions of the social calendar are the inter-society Mid- Winter 
Ball, and the Hyperian Dinner Dance. 

EVELYN ALVORD President 

LUCILLE DAMM Vice President 

MARGUERITE HANKWITZ Secretary 

ANN FULLER -------- Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MISS WRIGHT MRS. DAVISON 

CLASS OF 1935 

EVELYN ALVORD AMELIA SMILANICH 

VERNA DAMM LUCILLE DAMM 

EUNICE HOCKENBROCK MARY SWISTON 
ROSE FORNO 

CLASS OF 1936 

ANN FULLER AGNES MULLEN 

IRMA MILLER MARIE HANSON 

MARGUERITE HANKWITZ RAGNA MULLEN 

CLASS OF 1937 

DOROTHY DAVISON VERNETTA NUTTER 

MARY VIRGINIA HIPKE MARGARET SJOLANDER 

JANE MARTIN 



Page Seventy-nine 



:THE 



TOWER 






Third row: C. Behringer, E. Doyle, C. Peterson, F. Ruppe, E. Swensen. 

Second row: Mr. Dawley, J. Ludvigson, P. O'Connor, H. Keller, J. Dolejs, B. Ney. 

First row: R, Gregg, P. Christianson, W. Griifin, E. Corosolla, R. Carp, I. Einum, C. Johnson. 

F. O. B. 

BECAUSE of its efforts to encourage interest in Stout athletics, F. O. B. is 
recognized as an organization which serves the college as well as its 
own members. 

The objectives of the club are to arouse student enthusiasm for athletics 
and to develop social activities. 

In 1934 the F. O. B.'s introduced the "Little Old Jug" as a stimulant to the 
rivalry existing during the football season between Eau Claire State Teachers 
College and The Stout Institute. The Apache Dance is the club's yearly con- 
tribution to the school's social program. 

ERNEST COROSOLLA ..--.. President 

JOHN LUDVIGSON Vice President 

HARRY KELLER Secretary 

JAMES EINUM Treasurer 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

MR. GOOD MR. BURBIDGE 

MR. DAWLEY 

CLASS OF 1935 

CHARLES BEHRINGER HARRY KELLER 

EUGENE DOYLE ERNEST COROSOLLA 

CHARLES PETERSON PATRICK O'CONNOR 

REUBEN CARP ERLING SWENSEN 

CLASS OF 1936 

JAMES EINUM JOHN LUDVIGSON 

BERNARD NEY FRANK RUPPE 

CHARLES JOHNSON 

CLASS OF 1937 

PETER CHRISTIANSON ROBERT ROBERTS 

WAYNE GRIFFIN ROBERT GREGG 

JOSEPH DOLEJS DAVID THOMAS 



Page Eighty 



THIRTY-FIVE 



,* # JJJJ I 



Third row: C. Romine, L. Braaten, D. Worman, S. Anderson, M. Ruud, O. Embretson, G. Olson. 
Second row: F. Outran, H. Woodworth, H. Moltzau, E. Gracie, L. Lundell, E. Ebert, J. Wood. 
First row: A. Feirer, R. Betterly, A. Bogaard, G. Hislop, R. Ainger, G. Kees, J. Feirer. 



K. F. S. 



THE name K. F. S. signifies the threefold objective of this social fraternity 
for men: knowledge, friendship, and society. Considerable attention is 
also given by K. F. S. to the study of school problems, and hearty support 
is extended to those movements which involve improvements in the school and 
its student body. An attitude of sincere brotherhood is maintained through the 
unified activity of men having mutual interests. 

Homecoming, intercollegiate athletic contests, and intramural sports are 
important occasions for K. F. S. activity. 

IOHN FEIRER President 

GORDON OLSON Vice President 

HEINRICH GAERTNER Secretary 

FREDERICK CURRAN Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MR. RAY MR. SHAFER 

CLASS OF 1935 

STEWART ANDERSON ALBERT FEIRER 

ERNEST EBERT CHARLES ROWE 

CHARLES ROMINE FREDERICK CURRAN 

GEORGE HISLOP HEINRICH GAERTNER 

RALPH BETTERLY HARLAND WOODWORTH 

CLASS OF 1936 

ROBERT AINGER JOHN FEIRER 

OSCAR EMBRETSON LAURENCE BRAATEN 

ALEX BOGAARD LEONARD LUNDELL 

CLASS OF 1937 

GORDON OLSON MELVIN RUUD 



Page Eighty-one 



"THE TOWER 




Second row: E. Christopherson, A. Smttcmich, E. Hockenbrock, M. Broun, E. Herwig. 
First row: R. Forno, G. Johnson, M. Swiston, J. Henning. 



PEGASUS 



C 



ANDIDATES for election into Pegasus Club must evidence sincere in- 
terest in literature, and must have attained a good academic rating in 
the English department. 



Pegasus devotes its bi-monthly meetings to a study of literature, devoting 
its attention to material both of the past and of the present. 

ROSE FORNO President 

AMELIA SMILANICH Vice President 

DOROTHY DAVISON ----- Secretary-Treasurer 
MISS CALLAHAN Adviser 



CLASS OF 1935 



MARY SWISTON 
MARY LOUISE NIBBE 
GRACE JOHNSON 
EUNICE HOCKENBROCK 



BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON 
AMELIA SMILANICH 
JANICE HENNING 
ROSE FORNO 



MARIE MURRAY 
ANITA NELSON 



CLASS OF 1936 



MERCEDA BRAUN 
IRMA MILLER 



MARY CURRAN 
MARION MILLER 
DOROTHY DAVISON 



CLASS OF 1937 



ERMA HERWIG 
JANE MARTIN 
ELEANOR FLANAGAN 



Page Eighty-two 



THIRTY-FIVE 



*%<ft A4& 



Third row: R. Carlson, M. Richert, E. Anderson, F. Ruesink, L. Hanson, A. Smilanich. 

Second row: M. Herpst, G. Johnson, H. Stein, E. Flanagan, M. Hanson, H. Good. 

First row: J. Henning, D. Jeffery, Mrs. Steves, Miss Buchanan, E, Hockenbrock, J. Green. 

AREME 

AREME comprises those women in the School of Home Economics who are 
members of the Order of the Eastern Star, or whose parents are affiliated 
with the Eastern Star or the Masons. 

The activities of the society include a varied social program. The club in- 
terests itself in social service projects at Christmas time, and encourages high 
scholarship by presenting a silver cup to the best qualified senior member. 

DORIS JEFFERY President 

EUNICE HOCKENBROCK Vice President 

GRACE JOHNSON Secretary 

AMELIA SMILANICH ------- Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MISS BUCHANAN MRS. STEVES 

CLASS OF 1935 

ROSAMOND CARLSON AMELIA SMILANICH 

EUNICE HOCKENBROCK JANICE HENNING 

MARLYS RICHERT GRACE JOHNSON 

JANE GREEN HARRIET STEIN 
DORIS JEFFERY 

CLASS OF 1936 

LILLIAN HANSON MARION HERPST 

MARIE MURRAY FLORENCE RUESINK 

MARIE HANSON 

CLASS OF 1937 

EMILY ANDERSON HELEN GOOD 

ELEANOR FLANAGAN 



Page Eighty-three 



:the tower 



THE WOMEN'S COUNCIL 



THE Women's Council is composed of the Dean of the School of Home 
Economics, the presidents of all women's organizations, an S. S. A. rep- 
resentative, and the chairman of the student personnel committee. The 
Council acts as an advisory and governing board for the groups allied through 
membership. 

The important duties of the Women's Council relate to the development 
of co-ordination in the varied activities of women's organizations, and co-opera- 
tion in the attitude of these organizations through better understanding and more 
intimate contact. 

Regular discussion meetings are held every month, at which time the sev- 
eral working committees present plans for the consideration and approval of 
the entire group. The Harvey Memorial Committee is responsible for the ar- 
rangement and care of the furnishings in the women's social room. The Com- 
mittee on Student Teas studies methods for facilitating the presentation of oc- 
casional afternoon teas for the student body. 

The Intersociety Committee, which controls the activities of the four social 
societies, S. M. A., Hyperian, Philomathean, and Pallas Athene, operates under 
the direction of the Women's Council. All problems arising from society activi- 
ties such as formal rushing and social affairs are referred to this committee. 



Page Eighty-four 




ELIGION 



:the tower 



*M 



% m - jn* 









mm »©'•■' mw/m^m'-m 



Y. W. C. A 



THE national motto of the Y. W. C. A. is: "I am come that she might have 
life and that she might live it more abundantly." The emblem is a blue 
triangle, which signifies mental, physical, and spiritual growth of the 
young woman. 

The association justifies its place in the extra-curricular program of Stout 
through the various activities which it promotes. In achieving its aim of main- 
taining a "high standard of social life by providing the best social contacts," 
the Y. W. C. A. organizes annually the Big and Little Sister movement, the 
Mother-Daughter Banquet, an all-school mixer and an all-school picnic. It 
also sponsors an inter-collegiate conference, with the help of the Y. M. C. A., 
and the extension of social service to the school and the community. 

OFFICERS 

JOYCE SHAFER ------- President 

MARIE HANSON ------ Vice President 

FLORENCE RUESINK Secretary 

MERLE HILL - Treasurer 

FACULTY MEMBERS CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

MISS McCALMONT - - - President AGNES STEINKE - - - Publicity 

MISS CARSON - Publicity ROSAMOND CARLSON - - Membership 

MISS WRIGHT - - - Membership MABEL JOOS ... - Social Service 

MISS LEEDOM - - - Social Service MILDRED MARTIN - - World Fellowship 

MISS KEEFER - - World Fellowship ORVETTA BRAKER - - - Program 

MRS. SHAFER .... Program ELAINE THOMAS - - - Hospitality 

MISS VERRELL - - - Hospitality 



Page Eighty-six 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Third row: H. Moltzau, W. Giese, F. Ruppe, W, Houg, P. Hansen, C. Brenner. 

Second row: C. Beauchamp, O. Lindstrom, C. Arnston, H. Hendrickson, C. Bjomson, R. Foster. 

First row: H. Schultz, Mr. Robinson, A. Barbo, R. May, W. Jackson, N. Erckmann. 



Y. M. C. A. 



EACH year the Young Men's Christian Association of The Stout Institute 
undertakes an activity program which encourages well-rounded develop- 
ment of the individual in accordance with Christian ideals. The Y. M. C. A. 
welcomes into its membership all men students who favor its objectives and 
who earnestly desire to participate in the work of the association. 

In addition to the discussion groups and social meetings which are re- 
stricted to members, the "Y" is responsible for many school-wide events which 
receive enthusiastic attendance from the entire student body. Chief among these 
are an intramural athletic program, Stunt Night, field trips, and open meetings. 

OFFICERS 



Administration 


ERNEST EBERT 


President 


Program 


HUGHITT MOLTZAU ■ 


Vice President 


Records 


WALLACE HOUG 


Secretary 


Finance 


AGDUR BARBO 


Treasurer 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

WILLIS GIESE Publicity 

CARL BRENNER Sports 

FRANCIS SHAW Social 

NORMAN ERCKMANN Discussion 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



MR. ROBINSON 



MR. DAWLEY 



Page Eighty-seven 



:the tower 




Fourth row: K. Price, P. Hansen, F. Ruppe, L. Hamerly, I. Feirer, P. O'Connor, C. Beauchamp. 

Third row: F. Duda, M. Lulloff, D, Flick, J. Hansen, L. Ausman, H. Millerin. 

Second row: M. Swiston, L. Damm, R. Lulloff, M. Price, E. Peck, A. Schernecker, M. Erpenbach, B. Doyle. 

First row: V. Damm, M. Braun, D. Strese, M. Finney, E. Trettin, A. Friedl. 

MARQUETTE-LA SALLE 

MARQUETTE-LA SALLE is an organization working for better fellowship 
among Catholic students on the campus, and for the maintenance of 
intimate contact between those students and their church. 

Once each month the members enjoy a breakfast meeting. The club is 
actively concerned with the educational and moral betterment of the individual. 

IVAN MILLENBACH President 

LUCILLE DAMM - Vice President 

KIRBY PRICE Secretary-Treasurer 

ADVISERS 



MR. RICH 



MR. HANSEN 



Page Eighty-eight 




ROFESSIONAL 



• THE TOWER 




Janice Henning, Agnes Mullen, Merle Hill, Marlys Richert, Dorothy Lloyd, Rose Forno. 



HOME ECONOMICS COUNCIL 



ALL women in the school of Home Economics are eligible for membership 
in the Home Economics Club, a social discussion group affiliated with 
the state and national organization. 

The club brings to students visiting speakers qualified to present pertinent, 
educational material relative to Home Economics. 

Through the Freshman Mixer Party, the Christmas Tea, and the Senior 
Breakfast, the organization adds to the social activities for women. 

MARLYS RICHERT President 

JANICE HENNING Vice President 

DOROTHY LLOYD Secretary 

AGNES MULLEN - Treasurer 

MERLE HILL Program Chairman 

ROSE FORNO ...... Social Chairman 

ADVISERS 

MISS WALSH MISS CRUISE 



Page Ninety 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Second row: O. Laurich, S. Anderson, B. Christopherson, M. Hill, D. Flick, I. Pickering, J. Shafer, E. Spaulding. 
First row: R. Forno, A. Steinke, M, Swiston, Miss Cruise, M. Miller, J. Henning, G. Lotwin. 



THE SCIENCE CLUB 



THE Science Club is composed of students and faculty members especially 
interested in keeping abreast of scientific progress. Weekly meetings are 
given over to a discussion of the more recent scientific contributions. Each 
semester the student members present a complete review of a particular phase 
of science. 



MARY SWISTON 
GERTRUDE LOTWIN - 
BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary -Treasurer 



MISS CRUISE 
MISS BACHMANN 



LUELLA ERICKSON 
ROSE FORNO 
JANICE HENNING 



INEZ PICKERING 
MERLE HILL 



OLGA LAURICH 
MARION MILLER 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



MISS WILLIAMS 
MISS McCALMONT 



CLASS OF 1935 



GERTRUDE LOTWIN 
BETTY CHRISTOPHERSON 
MARY SWISTON 



CLASS OF 1936 



ESTHER SPAULDING 
AGNES STEINKE 



CLASS OF 1937 



LORETTA ZASTROW 
DORIS FLICK 



Page Ninety-one 



:THE 



TOWER 




Third row: V. Jewett, F. Ruppe, W. Giese, J. Milnes, R. Sherman, K. Lohr. 
Second row: C. Bjomson, F. Shaw, K. Price, C Rowe, L. Charlick, H. Kubalek. 
First row: A. Gauvin, H. Schultz, D. Thomas, H. Beach, Mr. Kranzusch, E. Hanson. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 



THE Arts and Crafts Club, associated with the National Home Work Shop 
Guild, encourages the worthy use of leisure time through the develop- 
ment of hobbies, and puts into practice the ideals of industry, skill, and 
honor. 

The members present lectures and demonstrations regularly. Through 
their affiliations with the club, students become acquainted with many vocations, 
and complete many useful, artistic projects, representing all phases of Indus- 
trial Arts. Their work in the club is excellent preparation for the direction of 
hobby clubs. 

HARRY BEACH President 

LeROY CHARLICK Vice President 

FRANCIS SHAW - Secretary 

KARL LOHR Treasurer 

ADVISER 

MR. KRANZUSCH 

CLASS OF 1935 

HARRY BEACH FRANCIS SHAW 

KARL LOHR LeROY CHARLICK 

CHARLES ROWE ROBERT SHERMAN 
CLIFFORD BJORNSON 

CLASS OF 1936 

WILLIS GIESE HARRY KUBALEK 

ARTHUR GAUVIN FRANK RUPPE 

KIRBY PRICE 

CLASS OF 1937 

ERWIN HANSON JACK MILNES 

HAROLD SCHULZ DAVID THOMAS 

VERNE IEWETT 



Page Ninety-two 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Third row: J. Williams, P. Hansen, F. Ruppe, L. Wolske, L. Puhl, S. Hollen, W. Jackson. 

Second row: J. Ludvigson, R. Klatt, H. Moltzau, A. Stephens, S. Giovannini, L. Charlick, M. McCulloch. 

First row: H. Martinson, P. Reinhard, W. Braker, Mr. Wigen, R. Foster, Mr. Hansen, Mr. Nelson. 

GUILD OF WOOD CRAFTSMEN 

IN THE fall of 1934 the organization of the Guild of Wood Craftsmen met a 
recognized need for a club through which men in Industrial Arts could de- 
velop a deeper interest in woodwork, realize opportunities for further study 
of professional and technical questions concerning woodwork, and discuss the 
problems of teachers in the field. G. W. C. meets once each month. 

ROY FOSTER President 

LESTER PUHL -.....- Vice President 

JOHN WILLIAMS Secretary 

JACK LUDVIGSON .---... Treasurer 

ADVISERS 

MR. HANSEN MR. P. NELSON 

MR. WIGGEN 

CLASS OF 1935 

LLOYD ERPENBACH VINCENT MYRICK 

SELMER HOLLEN LAWRENCE WOLSKE 

HELMER MARTINSON PAUL HANSEN 

PAUL REINHARD RICHARD KLATT 

ERNEST EBERT LESTER PUHL 

WARREN JACKSON LeROY CHARLICK 

CLASS OF 1936 

ROY FOSTER JOHN WILLIAMS 

HUGHITT MOLTZAU JACK LUDVIGSON 

STEVE GIOVANNINI GRANT VENNES 
FRANK RUPPE 

CLASS OF 1937 

WILLIAM BRAKER ALLEN STEPHENS 

MALCOLM McCULLOCH 



Page Ninety-three 



:the 



TOWER 




Second row: A. Arnston, L. Kaiser, E. Bressler, F. Ruppe, W. Honnan. 

First row: J. Ludvigson, J. Govin, H. Keller, L. Braaten, C. McCIellan, E. Hanson. 



METALLURGY 



THE Metallurgy Club unites a group of men who have in view a common 
vocation. Individual research, group study and discussion, and the oc- 
casional introduction of an outside speaker are part of the organization's 
program to keep in close touch with the rapid changes and developments in 
the metal industry. 

The metallurgists are keen participants in the intramural sports for men; 
the club presents a trophy to the man attaining the highest total score. 

CLARENCE McCLELLAN President 

JAMES GOVIN Vice President 

WOODRUS HORMAN Secretary 

LAWRENCE KAISER Treasurer 

ADVISER 

MR. MILNES 

CLASS OF 1935 

JAMES GOVIN GERALD DECKER 

HARRY KELLER CLARENCE McCLELLAN 

WOODRUS HORMAN RUSSELL MAY 
EDWARD BRESSLER 

CLASS OF 1936 

LEO WALLNER LAWRENCE BRAATEN 

ERWIN HANSON FRANK RUPPE 

JOHN LUDVIGSON CHARLES ARNOLDT 

LAWRENCE KAISER ARTHUR GAUVIN 

CLASS OF 1937 

CLARENCE ARNSTON 



Page Ninety-four 




RAMATICS 



:the tower 



ONE of the great problems that face every college dramatic organization 
as well as every director who has a due regard for the significance of 
drama, and the responsibility and trust that it entails, is suggested in the 
following question: Should audiences in the college theatre be given what they 
want, or what the organization and its directors think they ought to have? 

Strange as it may seem, there is a goodly number of college audiences who 
will not of their own volition select the more substantial thing in dramatic en- 
tertainment; (we hesitate to say the "more worthwhile" because of the "yellow 
leaf" into which that term has lately fallen). On the contrary, they will select that 
which will readily interest and amuse them regardless of the truth or real worth 
of the play, and they are quick to resent anything that does not come within the 
general category of "light and entertaining." Truth, beauty, power, are ac- 
ceptable only if readily assimilable and not "too serious." 

The dramatic organization and the director are, therefore, frequently con- 
fronted by a dilemma: to give the majority what they want, thereby winning a 
quick and often a lasting praise; or to ignore the wishes of the less discerning but 
larger group and give the more discriminating but small minority what it desires, 
thereby satisfying a finer urge, but provoking considerable resentment in a large 
group of the student body, the members of which feel that they ought not to be 
compelled to think or feel deeply when they see a play. 

Many will contend that it is the duty of the college theatre to build up, to 
stimulate and develop the general level of appreciation; that college students 
ought not to be mollycoddled. These protagonists of the more substantial thing 
in the theatre are apt to lose sight of the fact that actors — even college actors — • 
must have an audience, and that the "make 'em take it" philosophy of developing 
appreciation may result — and often does — in an empty house. Again, those who 
would hold on high the guerdon of the college theatre will argue that if the better 
thing is skillfully produced and artistically interpreted one need not fear for 
its acceptance even among those who have somehow confused the stage with 
the circus. Theoretically this would seem to be irrefutably sound, but those 
who are acquainted at first hand with the limitations of the non-professional 
stage know only too well the many practical problems that stand, like the 
twin shadows of Termagant and Herod, in the way of its fulfillment. 

What then is the solution, or is there a solution? The answer to the dilemma 
would seem to lie in the realm of compromise between the two extremes. For 
it is possible — though not as frequently as one might at first suppose — to find 
plays that have a tremendous popular appeal, that contain many of the inherent 
values of sincere drama, that are in themselves worth doing, and that can be 
effectively produced and acted by college players. 

Sheer fun in the college theatre is not to be scorned. A rollicking good 
farce that has nothing else to commend it but that it is gloriously funny has a 
definite and valuable place. Aside from the fact that it is pleasant entertain- 
ment, it may serve to win a loyal audience among the larger group whose taste 
for the more substantial drama still remains uncultivated; and by the skillful 
introduction from time to time of the play with profounder merit, an audience, that 
might otherwise have been lost or hostile to the strength and beauty of which the 
college theatre at its best is capable, is eventually won over. 

The ideal, of course, would be to attempt to build up appreciation through 
a long-time plan of carefully selected plays that afforded varied appeals com- 
mensurate with the aesthetic levels of the larger group, and then gradually to 
grade this selection upward as the aesthetic "tolerance" of the group increased, 
so that eventually one might hope that the average student might safely risk a 
normal exposure without pain or regret. 

— Leon Lassers, Director, Manual Arts Players. 



Page Ninety-six 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Fourth row: V. Jewett, I. Lonnholm, I. Feirer, Mr. Lassers, B. Lohrie, L. Berger. 

Third row: C. Romine, A. Feirer, L. Wolske, T. Piereon, Mr. Grinnell, R. lohnson. 

Second row: W. Griffin, R. Bubeck, A. Nelson, D. Strese, H. Robinson, P. Lauermann, I. Shafer. 

First row: B. Keith, M. Klatt, I. Miller, D. Omsted, L. McLaughlin, L. Owen, J. Green, V. Nutter. 



MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 



THE Manual Arts Players are a group of students whose combined efforts 
enable them to realize a threefold purpose: the development of taste and 
appreciation for the best in dramatic literature, the attainment of skill 
in the art of impersonation, and the provision for fundamental training which 
may serve as a basis for future activity in all phases of amateur production. 

The Club is instrumental in bringing college entertainment of excellent qual- 
ity to the school. The pleasure with which students anticipate M. A. P. produc- 
tions is indicative of the praiseworthy work which the members do. 

Each year the organization presents several major plays to the public and, 
in addition, during regular meetings, pursues knowledge in the many divisions 
of dramatics, such as make-up, costuming, and stage direction. The social cal- 
endar of the Manual Arts Players includes a formal dinner dance each semester. 

ALBERT FEIRER President 

OLIVE HYLLAND Vice-President 

JANE GREEN Secretary 

WAYNE GRIFFIN Treasurer 

ADVISER 
MR. LASSERS 



Page Ninety-seven 



:the tower 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



FOR many years the Manual Arts Players have been considering the ad- 
vantages to be gained through affiliation with a national dramatic fra- 
ternity, and have long looked forward to the possibility of becoming a 
part of such an organization. That desire is now an actuality, and the advan- 
tages of association are theirs. In the Spring of 1935 Alpha Psi Omega, a Na- 
tional Honorary Dramatic Fraternity, accepted the petition of the Manual Arts 
Players for a charter grant at The Stout Institute. The local chapter is known as 
Zeta Beta Cast. 

Alpha Psi Omega is the largest of all dramatic fraternities, embracing some 
one hundred and twenty chapters in the various colleges of the United States and 
Canada. It was organized to provide an honorary fraternity for those doing a 
high standard of work in dramatics, and to offer a wider fellowship, through 
broad associations, for those interested in the college theatre. The fraternity does 
not take the place of the college dramatic club, but as students in that club 
qualify, they are rewarded by election to membership. 

Zeta Beta Cast of Alpha Psi Omega serves as an honor society to stimulate 
and reward worthy participation in the productions of the Manual Arts Players. 
It is, in essence, the ultimate goal toward which every M. A. P. strives. Seven 
students were initiated as charter members at the installation of the chapter: 
Ruth Bubeck, Jane Green, Olive Hylland, Albert Feirer.John Feirer, Lawrence 
Wolske, and Wayne Griffin. Zeta Beta Cast is also permitted to award mem- 
bership to those former students and alumni of Stout who participated in suffi- 
cient plays as members of the Manual Arts Players to meet the requirements of 
the honor society. 

The advantages which the Manual Arts Players gain through affiliation with 
Alpha Psi Omega are outlined in the three aims of the fraternity: to provide 
an organization to distribute information upon the problems of college dramatic 
production; to provide suggestions concerning the selection of plays to aid in 
planning a suitable season's work for college clubs; and to provide a national 
honor society, membership in which may be awarded to students for outstanding 
work in the dramatic club of the college. As a member of the Association of 
Speech Arts Fraternities, Alpha Psi Omega awards its members a distinction 
which is both an honor and a professional asset. 



Page_Ninety-eight 




ORMITORIES 



:THE TOWER 




TAINTER ANNEX 



DORIS ANDREWS 
MARIE AVERILL 
DORIS BAHLS 
WILLA BOIRE 
FLORENCE BECKER 
ELSA CARLSON 
ROSAMOND CARLSON 
CAROL CHINOWETH 
ARDYS CHRISTIANSON 
MYRTLE COLTER 
DOROTHY DAVISON 
ELEANOR FLANAGAN 
AGNES FRIEDL 
HELEN GANTZER 
BERTHA GATES 
MARGUERITE HANKWITZ 
MARIE HANSON 
MARY VIRGINIA HIPKE 
MABLE JOOS 



PHYLLIS LAUERMANN 
OLGA LAURICH 
DOROTHY LLOYD 
ROSEMARY LULLOFF 
MARJORIE LULLOFF 
HILDEGARDE LUTZE 
PATRICIA MALY 
MILDRED MARTIN 
STELLA MEATH 
VELDA MILBROT 
MARIAN MILLER 
ELEANOR NELSON 
MARY MARGARET NORMAN 
EUGENIA NOWACK 
ALLOUISE OVERBECK 
LENORA PAULSON 
ROSELYN POTTER 
ALMA RAUSCH 
KATHERINE RICE 

Hostess— MISS BACHMANN 



HELEN ROBINSON 
NORMA ROWE 
LUCILLE SAECKER 
BARBARA SAWYER 
HARRIET SCHNITGER 
MARGARET SJOLANDER 
JUNE SMITH 
HARRIET STANTON 
ELNER STEINER 
MARJORY STEINER 
RUTH TALCOTT 
BEULAH TOMLIN 
ELIZABETH TRETTIN 
JEAN WATSON 
KATHERINE WATSON 
BETTY WEBB 
EDNA GRACE WEBB 
MARIAN ZIERATH 



FIRST SEMESTER 



SECOND SEMESTER 



MABEL JOOS 
DOROTHY LLOYD 
PHYLLIS LAUERMANN 
MARJORIE STEINER 
DORIS FLICK 
LENORA PAULSON 



} 



Proctors 



Treasurer 

Asst. Treasurer 

Secretary 



KATHERINE RICE 
MARIE AVERILL 
HILDEGARDE LUTZE 
MARJORIE STEINER 
HELEN GANTZER 
DORIS BAHLS 



} 



Proctors 



Treasurer 

Asst. Treasurer 

Secretary 



Page One Hundred 



THIRTY-FIVE 




LYNWOOD HALL 



ROBERT AINGER 
HARVEY BAIER 
KEIL BLANK 
NEIL BLANK 
PAUL BONDELIE 
JOHN M. BROPHY 
DARVEY CARLSEN 
REUBEN CARP 
PETER CHRISTIANSON 
DOUGLAS CLAUSEN 
CHARLES CRYDERMAN 
DAN DANIELSON 
JOE DOLJES 
FRANKLIN DUDA 
NORMAN ERCKMANN 
STANLEY FOX 
STEVE GIOVANNINI 
CORBETT GRANT 
OSCAR GRONSETH 
ROY GWYNN 
PEDRO HENDERSON 
GEORGE HISLOP 
VERNE JEWETT 
GALEN KEES 
HUGH KEOWN 
PAUL KEYES 
HARRY J. KUBALEK 



EARL LAATSCH 
WALTER LaTONDRESSE 
WILLIAM LEYHE 
LAWRENCE LINDGREN 
CHARLES LOTZ 
LEONARD LUNDELL 
NEIL MAXWELL 
HAROLD PAULSON 
CHARLES PETERSON 
ADRIAN POLLOCK 
JOHN ROANG 
ROBERT ROBERTS 
CHARLES ROMINE 
HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
MELFORD RUUD 
MARVIN SAWYER 
ELLIOTT SELVES 
SIDNEY SKINNER 
RAYMOND SOMSEN 
ANDREAS STOLEN 
DAVID THOMAS 
DELMAR WINNING 
WILLIAM WIVELL 
JAMES WOOD 
HARLAND WOODWORTH 
NEIL ZEUG 



Hostess— MRS. MABEL DAVISON 

HARRY J. KUBALEK President 

STEVE F. GIOVANNINI Vice President 

HUGH KEOWN Secretary 

HARLAND WOODWORTH - Treasurer 



Pago One Hundred One 



:the tower 







4(»ir= 




■ ■** ■ 








»f 


$ # 






8^f 


i 


> 


><•> 


€ ■ 



TAINTER HALL 



MERCEDA BRAUN 
MARY DEE 
ROSE FORNO 
LORENE GRASLIE 
VIRGINIA GUNZ 
EUNICE HOCKENBROCK 
DORIS JEFFERY 
FANCHON JOHNSON 
GRACE JOHNSON 
MARY ELLEN KLATT 
JANE MARTIN 



MARY MUELLER 
MARIE MURRAY 
MARY LOUISE NIBBE 
ALICE NICHOLS 
DOROTHY OMSTED 
JOSEPHINE REINKE 
MARGARET RIGGERT 
DOROTHY SALZMAN 
HARRIET STEIN 
DOROTHY STRESE 



Hostess— MRS. GRACE DOW 



Page One Hundred Two 



THIRTY-FIVE 



Coach Earl Burbidge 
Coach Burbidge has been head coach 
and athletic director at Stout since 1931. 
Graduating from the University of Wiscon- 
sin in 1928, Mr. Burbidge went to Antigo 
High School where he attained unusual 
success as a coach. He has been ham- 
pered by the lack of sufficient college ma- 
terial to produce champions, but never- 
theless, has put out a number of strong 
teams. His greatest contribution is Stout's 
extensive intramural program. Coach 
Burbidge is leaving the coaching field to 
study medicine at Washington University. 





Honorary Captain Gaertner 

"Heinie," as he is known to most of 
the students at Stout, was the main 
cog in the defense of the Blue Devils 
during the past season. In his three 
years of basketball competition he 
has played a cool, consistent brand 
of ball; the forward who has scored 
over him has been lucky. Since com- 
ing to Stout Gaertner has been the 
recipient of six major letters, three in 
basketball and three in football. His 
position in the Blue Machine will be 
hard to fill. 



Honorary Captain O'Connor 

"Pat," stellar center for the past 
two seasons, is worthy of the honor 
given him by his teammates in their 
selection of him as honorary captain 
of the 1934 squad. He has always 
played a good defensive game and 
taken a lot of punishment in the cen- 
ter of the line. "Pat" could be de- 
pended upon to give all the "Irish" 
he had to the game. We now look 
forward to his bolstering the line in 
his remaining year of competition. 



Page One Hundred Five 



:the tower 




Fourth row: Hanson, Peterson, Lohrie, Ruppe, Embretson, Dolejs, Kees, Olson. 

Third row: Skinner, Woodworth, O'Connor, Johnson, Fox, Von Gonten, Samdahl, Coach Burbidge. 

Second row: Bogaard, Vennes, Roberts, Puhl, Doyle, Nutter, Arnoldt, Stephens. 

First row: Ainger, Karlen, Gregg, Johnson. 



CONFERENCE STANDING 
Northern Division 

W L 

La Crosse 4 

River Falls 3 1 

Superior 1 1 

Eau Claire 1 2 

Stout 4 



T 


Pet. 





1.000 





.750 


2 


.500 


1 


.333 





.000 



Page One Hundred Six 





Robert Roberts 



Alex Bogaard 



Gordon Von Gonten 



Allan Samdahl 



Lester Puhl 



THE opening drills of the 1934 Stout football team presented the task of 
building a strong team from a squad composed of five lettermen, several 
veteran squad members, and a majority of freshmen and new men. A 
light and comparatively inexperienced team was the only prospect facing Coach 
Earl Burbidge and his assistants. The line weighed from fifteen to twenty pounds 
less per man than the average of the Wisconsin Teachers College lines, who 
opposed them in the conference race. The margin of difference between the 
backfield men was less, but the Stout ball carriers were much lighter than 
their opponents. 

With interest high as a result of the strong showing of the 1933 team, the 
Blue Devils had a large following in the practice scrimmages in preparation for 
the opening game. The game was to be played at the fairgrounds and marked 
the opening of the last season of competition there, while the seeding on the 
new Burton E. Nelson field was growing sufficiently. 

The Blue Devils tackled St. Mary's of Winona in the opening non-confer- 
ence game and the first home engagement. The Winona team was playing its 
first game under its new coach, Edward "Moose" Krause, Notre Dame Ail- 
American tackle and basketball center. Using the Notre Dame shift and play- 
ing in mid-season form, St. Mary's swept over Stout for a 27 to victory. The 
failure of the Blue Devils to shift with their veteran opponents made the Rockne 
system especially effective during the first half. "Dee" Nutter, Freshman half- 
back, featured the Stout attack during the scoreless second half and displayed 
enough clever running to mark him as Stout's greatest threat. Unable to gain 
against the aroused Stout eleven, St. Mary's protected the winning margin re- 
sulting from accurate passes and Stout's weakness on pass defense. 



Page One Hundred Seven 




Joe Dolejs 



DeWayne Nutter 



Charles Arnoldt 



Kelly Karlen 



Frank Ruppe 



Stout stepped into the homecoming limelight for the second non-conference 
game when it opposed Northland college in the homecoming game at Ashland. 
The opening of Stout's homecoming schedule forced the Blue and White grid- 
ders to play four games against opponents inspired by a homecoming cele- 
bration and featured games. Stout received the ball on the kick-off and, after 
a long return, started a drive that fell just short of the Northland goal. Fumbles 
and poor judgment terminated the charge. Nutter and Schabacker were both 
in the open during the game but slipped with touchdowns in their hands. Stout 
gained consistently in spite of the slippery field, especially on the right side of 
the line, but lost to the inspired Northland team, 20 to 14. 

Stout's most important game, the homecoming game at Menomonie against 
River Falls, followed the Northland battle. The Stout homecoming, the opening 
conference game, and the desire to beat the Falcons aroused the crippled Blue 
Devils. Dawson and Brickner, River Falls candidates for the all-conference 
team, ran wild early in the game, which was marked by the exceptionally crisp 
blocking of the Falcons. Cut-backs and reverses were effective as the anxious 
Stout players charged through to stop the Falcons. Rendler, a stocky two 
hundred and ten pound back, plowed through the tiring Blue Devils for long 
gains in the second half, often carrying several tacklers with him. Stout's only 
threat, and the most sensational of the year, came in the second quarter. Mix- 
ing Nutter's hard running with a variety of lateral and forward passes, Stout 
thrilled the fans with an attack that swept back and forth across the field for 
several first downs. The timer's gun at the half terminated the drive that was 
never renewed and Stout lost 26 to 0. 

Smarting under the defeat here in 1933, Avis and the veteran Superior play- 
ers were more than anxious to trim Stout. A drenching rain which lasted nearly 
thirty hours preceding the game, and during it, handicapped the lighter Blue 
Devils. Unable to pass or run the ball on the wet field, both teams were limited 
to a plunging game at which the heavier Superior team had an advantage. In 
spite of this, Stout gained consistently through the Superior line and succumbed 
only to the fresh reserves of the Yellowjackets. Schabacher gained steadily, 
but Stout failed to bunch its first downs as well as Superior. Blocked punts and 
a couple of Superior's "rain passes" accounted for the 20 to score against the 
soaked Blue Devils. 



Page One Hundred Eight 




Karland Woodworth 



Gordon Olson 



Grant Vennes 



The Eau Claire game, a typical homecoming battle, was played in a sea of 
mud. After a few minutes of play on the rain-soaked field, the players were 
hardly distinguishable, as they waded in the puddles and slid after the slippery 
ball. Ball carriers and blockers were unable to see. O'Connor, Stout's capable 
center, was noticeable in the line as he played the muddy ball, called for 
towels, and charged through the Eau Claire forwards. In the words of a wag, 
"it was the dirtiest game of the year." Eau Claire's heavier team gained slowly 
on plunges while Stout's running attack was helpless. Several rallies failed 
when the Blue Devils were misdirected into the wetter parts of the field where 
the attack "bogged down." A long pass and a blocked punt resulted in two 
touchdowns in the otherwise even game. Eau Claire won 1 2 to 0. 

In the closing game an inspired Stout eleven battled La Crosse champion- 
ship contenders gunning for an undisputed title, over every inch of the fair- 
ground field. With Ruppe, Von Gonten, and the whole Stout line smashing 
through to make tackles before the La Crosse attack got under way, the Racquets 
were stopped cold during the first half and until late in the game. Nutter led 
the Stout offense, matching the efforts of the highly praised La Crosse ballcarriers 
during the first half and squirming through for several first downs late in the 
game. With fresh reserves pouring into the game constantly, La Crosse downed 
the stubborn Blue Devils and went on to win by a score of 19 to 0. Ruppe 
starred on defense as the Stout eleven put up the hardest fight of the year. 
Ruppe, Puhl, Woodworth, and Peterson played their last game for Stout. 

The game fight against La Crosse closed Stout's losing schedule but showed 
the Blue Devils playing the best game of the year. Faced with a hard schedule 
and a light, inexperienced team, Coach Earl Burbidge had brought them to the 
point where their stand against the new conference champions impressed the 
discouraged fans. 

With so few veterans graduating and this year's team largely composed 
of present Freshmen and Sophomores, prospects for next year are encouraging. 
Although the 1934 season was a disastrous one in the percentage columns, the 
young players were developed through the year to the point where, supported 
by a few capable new men, they will be a strong contender in the 1935 con- 
ference race. 



Page One Hundred Nine 



:the tower 




Second row: Coach Burbidge, Ludvigson, Erpenbach, Peterson, Ruud, Von Gonten, Decker, Skinner. 
First row: Braaten, Worman, Gaertner, Dolejs, Moldenhauer. 



CONFERENCE STANDING 
Northern Division 

W L TP 

Superior 6 2 306 

La Crosse 6 2 268 

River Falls 5 3 304 

Eau Claire 3 5 250 

Stout 8 205 



OP 


Pet. 


219 


.750 


252 


.750 


248 


.625 


300 


.375 


314 


.000 



Page One Hundred Ten 





Eileit Moldenhauer 



Lloyd Erpenbach 



Lawrence Braaten 



Gerald Decker 



Charles Peterson 



THE CAGE SEASON 



COACH Burbidge's call for basketball material produced twenty candidates, 
including only three lettermen, Gaertner, Braaten, and Dolejs of last 
year's squad. 

With only two weeks of practice and elimination, the Blue Devils opened the 
1934-35 cage season by invading the hardwood court of the St. Paul "Y." Eleven 
men were used by Coach Burbidge. The game was a typical early-season con- 
flict, marked with poor passing and ragged shooting. Paced by Gaertner, 
Stout had little difficulty in leading throughout the game and emerged from the 
tilt victorious by a 33 to 32 score. 

The Burbidgemen next encountered the fast Winona Teachers at Winona. 
The Teachers led throughout the first period; Stout rallied in the second half 
only to fall short of a victory by a 30 to 28 count. The early drive by the 
Teachers was led by Wocks and Rothwell. "Darby" Worman, Erpenbach, and 
Gaertner led the Stout attack. 

Stout's non-conference victories continued to grow when the Blue Devils 
had little trouble in defeating St. Paul Luther on the home court. Piling up 
a big lead in the first half, the Blue Devils coasted to an easy 45 to 20 victory. 
To analyze the efficiency of different combinations Coach Burbidge used thir- 
teen men. 

Thursday, December 21, found the Devils playing their last non-conference 
game with St. Olaf here. Led by Ostberg, St. Olaf star center, the visitors had 
little trouble in trombling Stout 37 to 16. Stout's shooting was especially bad, 
with few follow-in shots accomplished against the St. Olaf guards. This game 
left the Blue Devils with an even break in the opening games, two victories and 
two defeats. 

After a period of rest due to the holidays, the conference season opened 
with the Burbidgemen playing the River Falls Falcons here. Both teams played 
ragged ball throughout the game. Stout's defense was seriously weakened 
by the illness of Dolejs and Gaertner. Practically all of Stout's scoring came 
in the first half. The Falcons tightened their defense in the second half to the 
point where they allowed Stout only eight shots at the basket, none of which 
scored, thus giving the visitors a 35 to 15 victory. 

The next conference battle found Stout returning a visit to the River Falls 
Falcons. The first half of the game was a one-sided affair, the score being 
24 to 9 in favor of River Falls. The Blue Machine functioned in the second half, 
however, to shorten the Falcon lead 32 to 29 with only three minutes left to play. 
At this time a sudden five-basket rally on the 'part of the Falcons gave them 
a 46 to 30 victory. Erpenbach led the Blue Devils' scoring with 12 points while 
Herkel starred for River Falls with 16 points. 

In their next game the Blue Devils were pushed to cellar position in the 
conference by the Zornmen of Eau Claire Teachers. Coach Burbidge's men 
played nice ball in the early stages of the game to lead at halftime 13 to 11. 



Page One Hundred Eleven 




John Ludvigson 



Gordon Von Gonten 



Darby Woman 



Joe Dole is 



Melford Ruud 



The Devils failed to click in the second period, allowing Held and Karrison, Eau 
Claire forwards, to break through for several baskets, which finally placed the 
Zornmen on the long end of a 32 to 22 count at the whistle. Ruud made some 
nice push shots to star for Stout. 

Paced by Ole Haugen, giant Superior center, the Superior Yellowjackets 
invaded the armory court to emerge the victors by a 47 to 24 Count. Only in the 
first few minutes of play did Stout lead, when three charity tosses were made 
in quick succession. An extreme advantage in size gave the Wherattmen easy 
coasting throughout the game. Darby Worman, pivot man for the Devils, 
starred for Stout. 

Playing a strong game in the first half, but weakened in the second half 
by the loss of Worman on personals, the Burbidgemen lost their return game 
with Superior 37 to 25. The Yellowjackets' success in the second half was 
achieved when Coach Wheratt shifted his offense, moving Haugen, ace scorer, 
to a forward position. Haugen led the Superior scoring with 17 points while 
Dolejs, Stout forward, sank two baskets and six charity shots to be high-point 
man for Stout. Decker and Gaertner were outstanding in defense. 

In the next conference tilt Stout opposed the strong Racquets of La Crosse. 

Playing the best brand of ball displayed on the home court this season, 
the Blue Devils suffered, nevertheless, their sixth consecutive defeat in confer- 
ence competition. Stout took an early lead and held it to half time, when the 
Racquets spurted to tie the score at 19 all. In the second half Stout's weakened 
power allowed La Crosse to push to a 38 to 29 victory. Joe Dolejs, forward, turned 
in a nice game for Stout, making 1 1 points while Butterwick starred for La Crosse 
with 9 points. 

Stout's only chance for a conference victory failed when the Blue Devils 
were defeated in their return tilt with the Eau Claire Teachers by a score of 
4 1 to 32. Both teams scored freely and evenly in the first half to make the score 
22 to 21 in favor of Eau Claire. Led by Held, forward, Eau Claire opened the 
second half with a scoring spree. Stout excelled at the free throw line but could 
not check the teachers' offensive drive. 

The Blue Devils closed their basketball season for 1934-35 when they were 
set back by the Racquets of La Crosse 38 to 28. The game was ragged through- 
out, being marred by 27 fouls on La Crosse and 20 on Stout. Worman was lost 
early in the second half by the four-foul ruling. The first half was an even 
toss-up, with Stout playing good ball, but in thb second half the Devils' defense 
weakened to allow La Crosse scoring freedom. Dolejs led the scoring for 
Stout with 1 1 points, while Watts, negro forward, starred for the Racquets with 
10 points. 

This game marked the close of the basketball careers of four of Stout's 
squad. Gaertner, Decker. Erpenbach, and Peterson will be lost to next year's 
squad by graduation. 



Page One Hundred Twelve 



THIRTY-FIVE 




THE CHEER LEADERS 

STUDENTS desiring to become cheerleaders register in the fall and are then 
elected on a competitive try-out basis by the school assembly. Try-outs 
are held in the college auditorium. 
This year Betty Keith was elected master cheer leader; her two assistants 
were Bob Johnson and Charles Arnoldt. All three have had high school ex- 
perience in leading yells, Keith and Johnson having been leaders at Menomonie 
High School during the past four years. Through their efforts school spirit has 
been promoted at the games and at the pep assemblies of the past year. 

After two years of service each cheer leader is awarded a sweater and 
a letter. 




Sidney Skinner 



Oscar Embretson 



THE MANAGERS 



Each year the athletic department selects two men to take charge of the 
athletic equipment. To each man is assigned the management of a single 
sport. This year football was managed by Oscar Embretson, while basketball 
equipment was handled by Sidney Skinner. 

Managers receive practical experience in bandaging, in taping, and in 
the care of equipment. After two years of experience they are awarded a 
sweater and a letter. 

Page One Hundred Thirteen 



:the tower 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

THE Stout intramural program is one of the most popular athletic activities 
during the school year. It is undoubtedly the largest program of intra- 
mural sports carried on by any of the Wisconsin Teacher Colleges. To 
Coach Burbidge we voice our appreciation for the establishment and success 
of this program. 

The object of intramural sports is to provide competition and opportunity 
in athletics for those not possessing enough ability to meet college competition 
in varsity football and basketball. "Sports for Everyone" is the motto of this 
yearly program. 

This year competition in the intramural program was derived from repre- 
sentations from six organizations: the K. F. S., F. O. B., G. W. C, Y. M. C. A., 
Metallurgy, and Lynwood Hall. Last year the F. O. B. organization won the Intra- 
mural trophy and is a strong contender this year. Competition is also keen 
between the K. F. S., G. W. C, and Lynwood. 

Each year an intramural manager is selected to have complete charge of 
all events. This year "Kelly" Karlen was chosen. It is the duty of the intramural 
manager to appoint officials, arrange schedules, and record the results in all 
events. In addition to a general manager each organization represented 
chooses a manager to direct the separate activities of that organization in the 
intramural sports. The managers for this year's program were: K. F. S., Gordon 
Olson; F. O. B., Eugene Doyle; G. W. C, Lester Puhl; Y. M. C A., Carl Brenner; 
Metallurgy, Clarence McClellan; Lynwood, Sidney Skinner. 

The program consists of twenty-four sports and activities. The activities 
have been divided into major and minor divisions with basketball, volley 
ball, ping pong, indoor relays, free throwing, horse shoes, tennis, golf, touch 
football, water polo, and swimming in the major sports divisions. Chess, bridge, 
five hundred, billiards, pool, checkers, and cribbage were classed under the 
minor sports classifications. 

All events are rated by a point system. Each team, both major and minor, 
received iifty points for entry in each event. In the major divisions first place 
received five hundred points, second three hundred, and third one hundred. 
In the minor division each first place received two hundred and fifty points, 
second one hundred and fifty and third fifty. 

As this book goes to press, all the events have not been completed; hence 
the complete results are not obtainable. 



Page One Hundred Fourteen 




1. Y. M. C. 


A 


COACH BURBIDGE 




4. Metallurgy 


2. F. O. B. 












5. K. F. 


s. 






manag: 


KARLEN 








3. Lynwood 












6. G. W 


. c. 




INTRAMURAL RESULTS 






TOUCH FOOTBALL 


VOLLEY BALL 




BASKETBALL 




BOWLING 


W L T 




W 


L 




W 


L 


W 


W. C 3 


K. F. S. _. 


9 


1 


F. O. B 


9 


1 


F. O. B 25 


F. S 1 1 1 


F. O. B. .. 


8 


2 


Lynwood 


7 


3 


K. F. S 20 


0. B 1 1 


Y. M. C. 


A. 6 


4 


Y. M. C. A. 


6 


4 


Lynwood 15 


fnwood 1 1 


G. W. C. 


5 


5 


G. W. C. __ 


4 


6 


Y. M. C. A 14 




Metallurgy 1 


9 


K. F. S. 


3 


7 


G. W. C 10 




Lynwood 


1 


9 


Metallurgy _ . 


2 


8 


Metallurgy 6 


SWIMMING 




FREE 


THROWING 




TEAM 


STANDING 




Pts. 






No. 






Pts. 


K.F.S. _ _ _ . 


24 


K. F. S. _ 




258 


F. O. 


B. __ 


_ _ _ 3400 


Lynwood 


_ .. 20 


F. O.B. __ 




. _ _ 242 


K. F. i 


3. 


2150 


F. O. B 


.__ _ 13 


G. W. C. _ 




_ 200 


Lynwood 


. - 1750 


Y. M. C. A. _ 


7 


Y. M. C. A. 

Lynwood 

Metallurgy 




. 190 

. _ _ __ 158 
140 


G. W 
Y.M. 
Metal 


C. 
C.A. _ 


850 




650 




lurgy 


200 



NIGHT THEATER 

Blue-black curtain of the night 
With gusty folds conceals the play; 
A bird-bell rings, and God's own hand 
Loops back the folds, and lo, 'tis day. 

— Louise Owen 



MORNING SERVICE 

How would you know that blessings fall 
From pink white apple trees? 
Of wind-hymns played on poplar reeds, 
I never showed you these. 

How could you know that grasses bend 
Dew-baptized heads in prayer. 
Of sparrows hushed while silence lays 
Her benediction there? 

How could you know that you should join 
The birds, the grass, the sod, and me 
With humbleness beneath these boughs 
In mute doxology? 

— Louise Owen 



STAR TEARS 

When the soft silver rain 

Falls in the night, 

And all the hushed world is sleeping, 

Then the arbutus drinks 

Deep in the wood 

The tears that the stars are weeping. 

— Marjorie Lulloff 



THE TOWER 



Page One Hundred Sixteen 



THIRTY. FIVE 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

THE department of Physical Education for women aims to build up in each 
student sufficient strength and vitality to meet the demands of a normally 
active life; to encourage an appreciation and maintenance of funda- 
mental health habits; to develop skill and permanent interest in wholesale rec- 
reational activities; and to help each girl adapt herself efficiently and happily 
to the demands made upon her by modern life. 

The department is continually being improved to meet the changing times 
and the new recreational activities being offered in a modern program of 
physical education. New sports, games, and necessary equipment are being 
added constantly to present a varied list from which to choose something of 
recreational interest to each girl. Field hockey, archery, shuffleboard, and deck 
tennis have been added recently for use in class, and for leisure time during the 
day. Clogging, character, and natural folk dancing, basketball, volley ball, 
and Danish gymnastic exercises are offered as a part of the program of the 
winter season. 

In most cases a girl is allowed to choose which class she wishes to enter 
for her physical education requirement. A restricted program is offered for 
girls whom physical disabilities keep from participation in all activities; thus 
they are given an opportunity to pass their requirement in the course and to 
develop a recreational interest. 

The intramural activities are sponsored, organized, and conducted by the 
sports managers of the Women's Athletic Association. "Play for play's sake," is 
their motto. Participation in all intramural activities is open to all women stu- 
dents of the college whether or not they are members of the association. The 
sports especially featured by individual and team competition are: field hockey, 
volley ball, basketball, archery, bowling, tennis, swimming, and shuffleboard. 
Each year the organization sponsors a posture contest for women and a general 
"splash" night for both men and women students. 

Bernice Reynolds, 
Director of Physical Education for Women. 



Page One Hundred Seventeen 




Archery 

Miss Reynolds, E. Brown, M. 
Brown, K. Watson, J. Cole, M. 
Price, E. Adams. 



Hockey- 



second row: M. Steiner, Baun, 
Thomas, Schernecker, Picker- 
ing, Howison, Meath, Miss Rey- 
nolds, Schnitger, Zastrow, Saw- 
yer, Becker, Rice, Potter. 

First row: Spaulding, Broker, 
Swan, Schultz, Steinke, Maly, 
Colter, Duesing, Nowack, Aver- 
ill, Lutze. 



Tennis 

Rice, Hankwitz, Steinke, Adams. 
Darling, Klinker, Lloyd, Erpen- 
bach, McEachron, Woody, 
Swan, Miss Reynolds. 



Volley Ball 

Second row: Thomas, Hill, 
Spaulding, Gunderson, Miss 
Reynolds, Sawyer, Becker, E. 
Carlson, Lutze, Averill, E. Webb. 

First row: E. Herwig, Bubeck, 
L. Hanson, Howison, Rice, Col- 
ter, Smith, Potter, M. Steiner. 



THIRTY-FIVE 



ARCHERY 



WITHIN the past two years archery has gained much in interest and popu- 
larity and has become one of the more skilled sports for women. Gay 
colored arrows darting through the air with lightning rapidity at each 
snap of the bowstring hold a fascination that only an archer knows. 

A steady arm and a keen eye won the Columbia round championship in the 
spring tournament for Katherine Watson with a score of 359. Ruth Graham 
placed second, and Marine Schultz third. 



HOCKEY 



The Sophomore-Freshman hockey game has been an annual match in the 
homecoming program. This year a team of Freshmen and Sophomores chal- 
lenged the Juniors. After a hard fought battle on the Stout lot, the Juniors gave 
way under the steady driving of the younger team, the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men winning with a score of 2 to 0. 



TENNIS 



With the first days of spring came the yearning to be out on the courts 
sending white tennis balls singing through the air. Rackets were brought out 
and carefully tested in preparation for the spring tournament. To continue 
competition in either the singles or doubles matches, one had to win two out 
of three sets. Blanche Klinker placed first in the singles and received the silver 
loving cup. "Peg" Hankwitz and "Katie" Rice outplayed their competitors 
in the doubles contest, winning the identification bracelets. 



CONTESTANTS 



DOUBLES 

JESSIE FISK— BLANCHE KLINKER MARGUERITE HANKWITZ— KATHERINE RICE 

DOROTHY BAUN— KATHERINE WATSON AGNES STEINKE— MARINE SCHULTZ 

JANE MARTIN— DOROTHY GARDNER MARY VIRGINIA HIPKE— JANE WASHBURN 
DOROTHY DARLING— MARION McEACHRON 



SINGLES 

BLANCHE KLINKER MARION McEACHRON 

MARY VIRGINIA HIPKE JESSIE FISK 

DOROTHY DARLING NATALIE BURNHAM 

MARIE ERPENBACH ORVETTA BRAKER 

FLORENCE BECKER ESTHER SPAULDING 

MARIE HANSON MARY FINNEY 

DOROTHY BAUN AGNES STEINKE 

DOROTHY LLOYD EVELYN ADAMS 

KATHERINE RICE EDITH SWAN 

JANE WASHBURN RUTH BUBECK 

CORDELIA MOODY MARINE SCHULTZ 

Page One Hundred Nineteen 



:THE TOWER 



VOLLEY BALL 



WOMEN'S intramurals found a place on the sport page of the Stoutonia 
this year as competition among the organizations became more keen. 
The W. A. A. sponsors an annual program of sports, but this is the first 
year it has conducted it on an intramural basis. Y. W. C. A., Hyperions, S. M. A., 
Pallas Athene, Philomatheans, and Tainter Annex participated. 

Volley ball was the first sport to engage the attention of the co-eds. Under 
the direction of Dorothy Howison, sports manager, fifteen games were played. 
The Dormitory and Pallas Athene tied for first place, each team winning four 
games and losing one. 

WINNING TEAMS 

AGNES STEINKE, Captain ERMA HERWIG 

MERLE HILL DOROTHY LLOYD 

LILLIAN HANSON ELAINE THOMAS 

HARRIET GUNDERSON ESTHER SPAULDING, Sub. 
RUTH BUBECK 

TAINTER ANNEX 

(CATHERINE RICE, Captain ROSELYN POTTER 

EDNA GRACE WEBB HILDEGARDE LUTZE 

ELSA CARLSON MARIE AVERILL, Sub. 

MARJORIE STEINER JUNE SMITH, Sub. 

MYRTLE COLTER BARBARA SAWYER, Sub. 
FLORENCE BECKER 

TEAM STANDINGS 

Lost 

Pallas Athene 1 

Tainter Annex 1 

Hyperions 3 

Y. W. C. A. 3 

S. M. A 3 

Philomatheans 4 



Won 


Points 


4 


500 


4 


500 


2 


300 


2 


300 


2 


300 


1 


100 



BASKETBALL 



The Y. W. team defeated the Philos 22 to 12 in the last basketball game of 
the women's intramurals. This win placed the undefeated Y team in first place. 
The winning team was composed of Ardis Brown, Captain, Edna Grace Webb, 
Edith Swan, Rosella Schill, Dorothy Howison, Loretta Zastrow, Helen Gantzer, 
Marine Schultz, and Mabel Joos. 

TEAM STANDINGS 

Won Lost Percentage 

Y. W. C. A 5 1.000 - 

Hyperions 4 1 .800 

Pallas Athene 3 2 .600 

Philomatheans 2 3 .400 

Dormitory 1 4 .200 

Page One Hundred Twenty 



THIRTY-FIVE 



ARCHERY 

ARCHERY again found its place in Women's Athletics in the intramural 
program. An indoor Columbia round of 72 arrows was shot from three 
distances — 35, 30, and 25 yards. Tainter Annex captured first place 
with a combined score of 780. Katherine Watson scored high with 404 points. 

Teams Players Individual Scores Team Scores 

Dorm Katherine Watson 404 780 

Eugenia Nowack 376 

Hyperions Marie Hanson 397 657 

Marguerite Hankwitz 260 

Pallas Athene Lillian Hanson 375 618 

Agnes Steinke 243 

Y. W. C. A Marjorie Price 371 599 

Marine Schultz 228 

Philos Marion McEachron 224 542 

Orvetta Broker 318 



BOWLING 



As the intramural program progressed, the girls invaded the bowling alleys 
and sent the pin-setters scurrying for shelter. Marine Schultz, bowling for the 
Y. W. C. A., obtained the highest score of the tourney, bowling 142. Other 
high scores were: Roselyn Potter, 132; "Peg" Hankwitz, 129; Edna Grace Webb, 
127; Marion Kubalek, 127; and Ruth Bubeck, 125. 

TEAM STANDINGS 

Won Lost Scores 

Hyperions 4 I 649 

Y. W. C. A. 4 1 668 

Pallas Athene 4 1 643 

Dorm 2 3 

Philos 1 4 

SWIMMING 

As a part of the intramural sports, the W. A. A. sponsored a water carnival 
on March twenty-eighth under the direction of Dorothy Baun, W. A; A. sports 
manager. Each of the five organizations, Y. W. C. A., Dorm, Philomatheans, 
Hyperions, and Pallas Athene, entered a team to represent it in relay races, in- 
dividual races, and form swimming. A water wedding and barrel rolling were 
features of the evening. Men's intramurals were run off on the same evening. 



Page One Hundred Twenty-one 



-THE TOWER 




Third row: R. Mullen, Herwig, A. Mullen, Thomas, E. Steiner, Hankwitz, Braun, Bubick, Darling. 

Second row: K. Watson, Braker, Rice, Howison, M. Brown, Baun, Hanson. 

First row: Skeels, McEachron, Schultz, Becker, Miss Reynolds, Spaulding, Steinke, Sjolander, Erpenbach. 

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

ESTHER SPAULDING President 

MERCEDA BRAUN ...... Vice President 

ORVETTA BRAKER Secretary 

AGNES STEINKE Treasurer 

MISS REYNOLDS Adviser 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

MARGARET SJOLANDER - - Social ' MARINE SCHULTZ .... Bowling 

RUTH BUBECK - - - Publicity DOROTHY BAUN - - - Swimming 

KATHERINE WATSON - - - Archery MARGUERITE HANKWITZ - - Tennis 

MARIE HANSON .... Hiking fHockey 

ERMA HERWIG - - - Volley Ball KATHERINE RICE - - --| Shuffleboard 

DOROTHY LLOYD - - - Basketball <- Deck Tennis 



MARION BROWN 



EVELYN BROWN 
RUTH BUBECK 
INEZ PICKERING 
MARINE SCHULTZ 
EDITH SWAN 
MARION McEACHRON 
MARGUERITE HANKWITZ 



LORETTA ZASTROW 
DOROTHY LLOYD 
ELNER STEINER 



MEMBERS 
CLASS OF 1935 

JANE COLE 

CLASS OF 1936 

MERCEDA BRAUN 
DOROTHY DARLING 
ELAINE THOMAS 
AGNES STEINKE 
AGNES MULLEN 
MARIE HANSON 
MARIE ERPENBACH 

CLASS OF 1937 

KATHERINE RICE 
FLORENCE BECKER 



KATHERINE WATSON 



DOROTHY BAUN 
DOROTHY HOWISON 
RAGNA MULLEN 
ESTHER SPAULDING 
CATHERINE SKEELS 
ORVETTA BRAKER 



ERMA HERWIG 
MARGARET SJOLANDER 



Page One Hundred Twenty-two 



THIRTY-FIVE 



THE STOUT RIFLE CLUB 





STOUT RIFLE CLUB 

THE Stout Rifle Club, affiliated with the National Rifle Association, seeks to 
increase proficiency in individual marksmanship by competitive mem- 
bership. Both individual and team contests are held within the club, as 
well as contests with other clubs in postal and shoulder-to-shoulder matches. 

Practice within the club is designed to develop sportsmanship, co-ordina- 
tion between mind and body, marksmanship, and a knowledge of the proper 
handling of firearms. At the end of the shooting season, the losers entertain the 
winners of team contests at a dinner. 

ROBERT AINGER President 

P. C. NELSON Vice President 

WALLACE HOUG Treasurer 

MARINE SCHULTZ Secretary 

ADVISER 

MR. NELSON 

CLASS OF 1935 

CLIFFORD BJORNSON HARRIET GUNDERSON 

CARL HAASE EDWARD BRESSLER 

CLASS OF 1936 

ROBERT AINGER ERWIN HANSON 

OSCAR LINSTROM WALLACE HOUG 

DOROTHY HOWISON MARINE SCHULTZ 

CLASS OF 1937 

BARBARA SAWYER 

CLASS OF 1938 

GEORGE BERGE DLEMAR WINNING 

OLAF HONAAS MARGARET JUNE SMITH 

ARTHUR MATHER EARL LAATSCH 



Page One Hundred Twenty-thre 



:the tower 



PENSIVITY 



They came with me one summer night 
And glided through the sky; 
We sat on Cassiopeia's chair, — 
My thoughts and I. 

We picked white daisies from the blue 

And let them fall to die, 

Upon the roof tops far below, — 

My thoughts and I. 

Then suddenly the moon was gone, 
The stars began to fly; 
And shelter far below we sought,— 
My thoughts and I. 

— Marion McEachron 



Page One Hundred Twenty-four 



THIRTY-FIVE 



THE STOUT INSTITUTE LYCEUM 

THE Lyceum Course of the past season, brought to Menomonie by The 
Stout Institute and open to the entire community, was arranged to meet 
the approval of keenly critical audiences. The numbers selected com- 
bined entertainment, information, and artistry by individuals who are acknowl- 
edged leaders in their several fields. The outstanding and well-balanced pro- 
gram proved superior in many respects to those which have been offered 
previously. 

The Little Philharmonic Orchestra, a group of fifteen musicians who have 
held prominent positions in the leading European and American Symphony 
orchestras, opened the Lyceum series. The great symphonic and orchestral 
works which these musicians presented to the Menomonie audience had been 
especially arranged by their leader, George H. Shapiro, himself a composer of 
hundreds of works. 

Captain Peter Freuchen, Danish explorer who spent many years of his life 
in Greenland, made his first lecture tour of the United States during the past 
winter. Captain Freuchen brought fascinating movies of the Eskimos, and much 
intensely interesting material relative to their customs and mode of living. 

Louis Untermeyer, American author, poet, anthologist, and critic, was in- 
troduced to Menomonie through the Lyceum program. His lecture on "What 
Americans Read and Why" provided an entertaining and educational check 
on individual reading tastes. 

The world-famous Tony Sarg's Marionettes played to a capacity audience 
in their presentation of "Faust, the Wicked Musician." This is the newest of the 
Sarg productions, showing all the skill and cleverness of his older plays, plus 
new and more elaborate developments in the art of puppetry. 

The closing number of the Lyceum program brought one of the world's 
leading Russian choruses, that of Mme. Margarita Slaviansky. This group has 
been heard in more than fifty nations, and has everywhere received the highest 
praise. The Slaviansky Chorus entertained with a novel program of singing 
and dancing. 



Page One Hundred Twenty-seven 



:THE TOWER 




Dorothy Strese 



Luella Erickson 



Evelyn Alvord 



Jane Green 



MID-WINTER BALL 



THE Intersociety Mid-Winter Ball introduced the formal social season of 
the second semester. A lighted sky, crystal ball, snow, and icicles trans- 
formed the Stout gymnasium into a spacious winter field in white and 
sparkling silver. From the orchestra pit, located in an iceberg, Tommy Temple 
and his Band produced delightful modern rhythm for seventy-five dancing 
couples. 

COMMITTEES 

DOROTHY STRESE General Chairman 

JANE GREEN Hospitality and Orchestra 

EVELYN ALVORD - Decorations 

LUELLA ERICKSON .... Programs and Invitations 
MARLYS RICHERT - - .... Finance 

LUCILLE DAMM Refreshments 

GUESTS OF HONOR 

President and Mrs. Burton E. Nelson, Dean Ruth E. Michaels, Dean and 
Mrs. Clyde A. Bowman, Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Grinnell, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Pric«. 



Page One Hundred Twenty-eight 



THIRTY-FIVE 




King — Hughitt Moltzau 
Queen- -Or vetta Broker 

JUNIOR PROM 

A night in the Orient ... a Buddha, Japanese dragons, colored lanterns, in- 
cense . . . The ninth annual Junior Promenade was an innovation in formal 
dance setting. 

COMMITTEES 

HUGHITT MOLTZAU .... - General Chairman 

CHARLES ARNOLDT Decorations 

JOHN FEIRER Reception 

STEVE GIOVANNINI Entertainment 

IRMA MILLER Refreshments 

LOUISE OWEN y Invitations 

RAGNA MULLEN Publicity 

HUBERT HUBER Finance 

HARRY KUBALEK ---.... Programs 

GUESTS OF HONOR 

President and Mrs- Burton E. Nelson, Dean Ruth E. Michaels, Dean and 
Mrs. Clyde A. Bowman, Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Grinnell, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Price. 

CHAPERONES 

Miss Dorothy Verrell and Mr. and Mrs- John M. Dawley. 



Page One Hundred Twenty-nine 



:T H E 



TOWER 



^Hh 












■ ■ !▼ ▼W 1 ' T 


i Vjt I 






L* 1 

[Jam 


MP Ef 


J J 1 



THE SUMMONING OF EVERYMAN 



Adaptation by John Baird 

Messenger Wayne Griffin 

Voice of God 

Death --.-..._.. Leon Lassers 

Deceit ---------- Julius Lonnholm 

Cowardice - - Robert Johnson 

Everyman - - - - - - - - Dr. J. E. Grinnell 

Fellow Albert Feirer 

Conscience -------- Wayne Griffin 

Cousin --------- Lawrence Wolske 

Kindred --------- Stuart Anderson 

Conceit --------- Charles Romine 

Malice --------- Verne Jewett 

Faith ---------- Joyce Shafer 

Evil -----.-... B en Lohrie 

Servant --------- Robert Johnson 

Goods ---------- fed Pierson 

Good Deeds -------- Lucille McLaughlin 

Knowledge --------- Helen Robinson 

Confession -------- Stuart Anderson 

Discretion - - - - - - - - - Ruth Bubeck 

Five Wits --------- Madelene Scott 

Strength ---------- Louis Berger 

Beauty ---------- Irma Miller 



Page One Hundred Thirty 



THIRTY-FIVE 



SEVENTEEN 

A comedy in four acts by Hugh S. Strange and Stannard Mears in collabora- 
tion with Stuart Walker. 

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French of New York. 



THE CAST 

Mr. Baxter --------- John Feirer 

Jane ----------- Louise Owen 

Mrs. Baxter --------- Jane Green 

William Sylvanus Baxter ------ Wayne Griffin 

Johnnie --------- Robert Johnson 

May Parcher -------- Dorothy Omsted 

Lola Pratt - - Olive Hylland 

Genesis --------- Laurence Wolske 

Joe ----------- Charles Romine 

Mr. Parcher -------- Albert Feirer 

George Crooper --------- Ben Lohrie 

Miss Boke --------- Evelyn Allen 

Wallie Banks ------- Stuart Anderson 

Mary Brooks --------- Anita Nelson 



THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING 

By John Emerson and Anita Loos 

THE CAST 

Harriet Simmons, wife of Henry Simmons - - - Lucille McLaughlin 
Annie, a maid --------- Joyce Shafer 

Taxi driver --------- Julius Lonnholm 

Henry Simmons, a manufacturer ----- Ted Pierson 

Ethel Simmons, the daughter ------ Jane Green 

Roger Shields, a young Chicago blood - Wayne Griffin 

Chester Binney, Simmons' partner ----- Albert Feirer 

Sally Otis J f Mary Ellen Klatt 

Lila Wilson j Friends of Ethel j Madelene Scott 

Mrs. Jackson and girls - - - - - - - - M. A. P. girls 

Donald Swift, a motion picture director - Lewis Berger 

Letty Lythe, a motion picture star ----- Anita Nelson 

Sadie Bloom -------- Olive Hylland 



Page One Hundred Thirty-one 




1. The "SMA Devils" — first prize in the 
homecoming parade. 



2. The Y. M. C. A. with its high "hopes." 




3. The Glee Clubs' song of a float. 



4. The Stout color guard on parade. 



5. Berney and his F. O. B. "crate." 



6. Stout's "Parade of the Wooden Sol- 
diers." 



7. President Nelson leads the way. 



8. Tough pitching; eh, fellows? 



9. The Philos had some ugly Falcons 
too. 



10. Another Stout demon with his prey. 



1. The S. M. A. girls — builders of the 
first prize float. 



2. Berney again, with Ludvigson as 
bodyguard. 



3. Hyperions — "Our Hearts Are Open 
to You." 



4. Sez You! 

5. "Frenchie," one of the color guards. 

6. The band on parade. 

7. Sun-blind, girls? 

8. Verne in all his glory. 

9. Lynwood Hall buddies. 

1 0. A few of the Wendtland House gang. 



1 1. Be careful, Doris; don't trust the stone 
too much. 



12. The band maneuvering at the home- 
coming game. 



13. Brothers and actors are we two. 








1. The Grand Finale. 



2. "Hettie" Stein, the girl comedian. 



3. Mrs. Dow with her eldest. 



4. De Rubeis — the accordian man. 



5. Devil in the making. 



6. Buddies, and so affectionate, too. 



7. Pals that hate to part. 



8. We're good pals, we are! 



9. You're not cold, are you, Skinner? 



10. Bud — the clergyman protem. 



1 1 . Come on, girls, get going. 



12. Women faculty on exhibition. 



13. Home makers are we six. 



14. Jimmy Homemaker. 



15. Careful, Jimmy. 



16. You're not hitch-hiking, are you, 
girls? 



17. Lonesome, Phil? 



1. Dave at home to his friends. 



2. Tough guys. 



3. Just a minute. It's snapped. Thank 
you. 



4. And it wasn't courtesy week either. 



5. Just a drag before classes. 



6. Editor and Associate Editor, but 
Phil, how do you rate? 



7. Such a big fish story. 



8. Mary Ellen, you're not posing as 
Gracie Allen, are you? • 



9. Who would guess who? 



10. Rushing to classes. 



11. Barley, you can't get away that 
easily. 



12. The Rambler Editor, the guy so 
many of you wanted to meet this 
year. 



13. Whither goest thou, Mr. Rich? 



14. What a lucky snap, Mr. Tustison. 





i r 



THE TOWER 



k ftM a My 



-four short years — a mad mixture of people, 



From registration to graduation- 
books, proms, and grade-cards. 

We live those years breathlessly, furiously, and thoughtlessly, ever 
hoping to gain more of that life that has given us our friends, our joys, and even 
our disappointments. We dare not lose one scrap — it is gone from us too soon. 
We are no longer the pivot of our college circle, we belong not even in the ring — 
but must take our place outside — remembering. 

In memory we waltz once more at the Spring Frolic, we eat one more rye 
sandwich at the Apache dance, and we are blinded once more by the dust 
storm of the April when we were Juniors. Four years we have been in Stout, 
but we shall walk down the familiar halls for many more; our memories hold 
us fast. 

The year — it passes in review. 

Merc and Virg, Carl and Bob, the constant foursome, frequented the Tainter 
Hall Bridge table while Rosie Forno cooked a royal Italian dinner for the girls 
at Home Management House. Shortly thereafter Rosie felt an inspiration, this 
time not to demonstrate her culinary skills, but for something more aesthetic. 
The results, as we found them on a torn sheet of paper, in her second desk 
drawer, are here reproduced: 

I wonder 



I wonder if 

My calico cat 
Dreams of a snooze 

In my new hat. 

I wonder if 

My gingham dog 
Longs to nap by 

A burning log. 

I wonder if 

My painted doll 
Would rather be 

At some gay ball. 

I wonder if 

These friends of mine 
Would care to come 

With me and dine. 
I wonder 



Page One Hundred Thirly-six 




F H I R T Y - F I V E 



, .* 




ZIP**- 



& ca a *t m -^ 



Not to be outdone Doris Jeffery also put down her thoughts in rhyme, 
seems that spring was in the air early in February when she wrote: — 



SPRING 

Laughter and music 

are filling the air, 
The spirit of springtime 

is everywhere. 
The glowing sun 

in the April breeze 
Brings forth buds 

on flowers and trees. 
Man and nature 

burst out in song 
Farewell, winter months — 

so cold and long. 

Then who but Roy Vincent donned a mess jacket and braved the Home 
Economics course, while Ski Curran deserted his logarithms long enough to 
mount his soap-box in declaration that being cultured is having the ability to 
say "Hors d'Oeuvres/' as if one knew what it meant. 

Candid Jane Martin with her ever perfect appearance, Bob Gregg, the per- 
sonification of subtle politeness, and Margaret Riggert with her flair of mis- 
chief, lean heavily on the radiator and count the trips Bill has made to the 
fourth floor. 

To Doris Jeffery history and pharmacy have no difference as long as there is 
a George mixed in. Miss Jeffery is unusually clever at concocting little schemes 
to speak with strange gentlemen. It is rumored that she went to a certain 
drug store where she babbled sweet nothings to a plaque of George Washing- 
ton. The pharmacist, another George, thought she meant him, came over, dis- 
covered his error — but the plan worked . 



f* »% 4' f 




Page One Hundred Thiity-seven 




L *'-*&&* 



:the tower 



Tainter Hall has many "reform sessions." Vital topics such as "dormitory 
difficulties" are discussed, dismembered, and then pigeonholed or put in the 
future reference file. At a recent meeting the blonde-brunette question was re- 
argued and again Dorothy Omsted and Marie Murray have been cited as sole 
owners to all the rights of the blondest blonde — such as telephone calls and 
bills, eerie noises in the night, and other small matters. Meetings like this 
must break up happily; so Mate and Alice, in the hope to restore all lost morale, 
gave their once-famous bed-dance, which didn't go over as well as it might have. 

Pat Maly, with the lowest tones ever heard, sobbed out a blues song and 
Edna Grace Webb made a spectacular high-dive into the chlorine waters of the 
pool. Then Thea leatran swirled a braid around her head and Betty Keith led 
the rooting section. The brunettes must fight for their honors. 

Ted Pierson, the itinerant library "checker-upper," the saxophone Wayne 
King, and the well-rounded Mr. Simmons were found to be very helpful at blow- 
ing up balloons for the Philo dance. We don't know whether blowing is natural 
for Ted or whether Dorothy Salzman kept him there. 

Ben Lohrie stops long enough to give Russell May» his understudy, the 
final directions for the chocolate pudding. He'd like it chilled and served with 
whipped cream, Russell. 

Fanchon Johnson is the brunette who dealt so unsparingly with the refresh- 
ments at the Apache dance, the girl who plays tennis at six in the morning, and 
who worries Mr. Antrim about library tactics. But then, who doesn't enjoy 
worrying, anyway? 

Poised soloist and agile cheer leader, all wrapped up in one small Betty 
Keith, have made pleasant harmony of U-rah-rah and "Chilly Waters." 

Someone said Reuben Carp is the life of the print-shop. From all appear- 
ances he is the life and death of it. The print-shop has many individual and. 
different characters housed in one glassed-in room, resembling a greenhouse 
but called The Stoutonia-Tower Headquarters. Here we find Viola — worried — 
editor-Larson and Viggo-persnickity-Nelson along with George Hislop — the 
proud parents of our ever dear Stoutonia. It was Reuben who caught Doris Brad- 
ley using Stoutonia's paste on the Tower dummy. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-eight 



\ , "^feU 



1 








THIRTY-FIVE 




4 "* 



— fa rt)! _ rf^^JL — ^- 




Edgar Gracie made his musical debut via the radio and stage this semester. 
Edgar sings "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" as though he were Irish. 

"Peaches" Keown, with a real Georgia-bred southern accent and Harriet 
Stein with her aptitude in French haven't gotten together yet. It does seem queer. 

Speaking of idiosyncrasies Alice Nichols used to sleep with a 

butcher knife under her pillow. Mary Dee and Mary Mueller are roof-walkers. 
Doris Andrews belongs to a "Widows' Club." And Barbara Sawyer proposes 
to rename the Women's chorus the "Hotcha Hemstitchers." 

Jimmie Wood found his calling in the art class and Charlie Romine did the 
dishes at the M. A. P. party until he received a proposal of marriage. 

Wayne Griffin met with unusual trouble at the Spring Play. When the 
lights went out for the "fight in the dark" scene, Wayne lost the lipstick that 
was to mark the bloody results of the fight. But Al Feirer did manage to get 
tossed up into the chandelier and Louis Berger broke a few chairs and tipped 
over a table. Someone said they really and truly did have a fight. We were 
only in the audience, but the report may be true. 

And then there were dances * 



The Tacky Drag with John Feirer studying the cash receipts, while Barbara 
Sawyer flashed a dangerously long plume very wickedly under the judges' 
noses and walked away with the prize. 

A series of dinner dances and a certain social-lion's endurance record 
broken when the S. M. A.s and Philos gave their parties on the same night at 
different places. Too bad, but one just can't go two places with two girls at 
the same time. 

The Inter-society Midwinter Ball was a chilly, sophisticated affair with 
snow men, and icicles — but after the receiving line had been made a thing of 
the past, the orchestra and the dancers revelled in a mutual "big time." 

It was late spring before the Prom came to be — but the plans had been 
brewing for weeks before. When finally on the evening of May fourth Hughitt 
Moltzau and Orvetta Broker led the line of couples down the floor in the grand 
march, the Tower had long since been to press. 




Page One Hundred Thirty-nine 



COVERS: COURTESY OF CLASS OF 1935 
SCENIC PHOTOGRAPHY — VIGGO NELSON